Mike Shannon's
DALLAS-FORT WORTH
AM STATION HISTORY
1920-2005
(Some fringe and rimshot stations are shown depending upon signal strength and location)


The success of AM radio after the advent of television
can be attributed to the late Gordon McLendon, who started
station KLIF in 1947.  KLIF became a trendsetter that
was reportedly the most copied station in America.
McLendon was one of the creators of Top 40 playlists,
a staple of programming that continues today.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF AM RADIO IN DALLAS-FORT WORTH...

Whether you knock AM radio today for its relentless static or its lack of music, this is where it all began.  The early 20th century brought the first radio stations to the Dallas-Fort Worth area:  KFJZ (with roots dating back to 1917,) WRR (in 1920,) WPA, WBAP and WFAA (all in 1922,) and the rest is history (well, almost!)  AM started out as a freewheeling, 'throw up a transmitter and go with it' gamut of radio waves in its earliest days, with a couple of assigned frequencies (833 kc [primarily news and weather] and 618.6 kc [primarily music.]) and virtually no rules to allow a fair distribution of the dial for broadcasters.  (By mid-1922, all five DFW stations agreed to a timesharing plan on each frequency.)  November 11, 1928 was declared "National Frequency Allocation Day," when the Federal Radio Commission (FRC, predecessor to the FCC) brought organization to the dial by assigning dedicated frequencies to the strongest stations, and culling out many of the small-time opportunists who weren't serious about broadcasting.  Powerhouse WBAP was awarded a clear channel position on the dial; it is one of only a small handful of stations in the nation that's allowed to blast its signal to a reported 42 states!  And to honor the art of "DX-ing" (distance listening,) Wednesdays after 3PM were declared "Silent Night" in the '20s...low-powered stations turned off their transmitters so that high-powered stations across the US could be easily received on anyone's dial.

AM radio in Dallas-Fort Worth, as with the rest of the nation, was mostly entertainment and news programming in its infancy; however, its value and importance was secured during World War II as the center of information for a concerned public.  With the introduction of television to the masses in the late 1940s, radio's demise was assumed to be imminent.  Gordon McLendon didn't let that happen:  In 1947, he signed on KLIF, featuring a music format.  Other stations soon followed, and local radio found its second life.  The invention of the transistor, and subsequently the development of lightweight, portable radios, along with the inclusion of radios in cars, helped the reinvented band find a new audience with people on the go.  McLendon and Todd Storz's simultaneous discovery of the "Top 40" in the 1950s gave radio a special popularity among the younger generation, and his KLIF, along with KBOX and KFJZ, developed formats to capitalize on current music, especially rock and roll.  Other local stations modified their formats to concentrate on news, country, rhythm and blues, or Spanish.  While KLIF posted incredible ratings during the 1950s and 1960s, others like KRLD and WBAP found successful programming niches that catered to older audiences.

AM's popularity and far-reaching capabilities were used by the government to launch a civil defense system, CONELRAD ("CONtrol of ELectromagnetic RADiation,") the forerunner of the Emergency Broadcast System (now Emergency Alert System,) in 1951.  (WRR engineer Rick Teddlie co-created the CONELRAD system.)  While the nuclear threat of the Cold War prompted the dedication of a national broadcast frequency, it wasn't until 1958 that the system was first used for weather alerts.  Broadcasts were originally dedicated to 640 and 1240 kc in all cities, and all regular broadcast stations (AM, FM and TV) were to go silent when threatening information was aired.  EBS replaced CONELRAD in 1963, and EAS replaced EBS in 1997.

By the early 1970s, however, listeners were slowly discovering the FM band and migrated to it for its static-free, stereophonic broadcasts; by 1978, FM overtook AM as the most popular band.  Attempts to revitalize AM have netted little; AM Stereo was proposed in 1958 and introduced in 1982 to big fanfare; many car manufacturers began to integrate AM Stereo into their radio units, and KRQX-570 became the first local AM Stereo station in 1983.  However, five different companies were pushing their systems to become the broadcasting standard.  This included Kahn Communications (who was at the forefront of AM Stereo development in 1958,) Harris, Motorola, Magnavox and Belar Electronics.  Motorola's C-Quam system was finally chosen by the FCC as the standard in 1993, but, by that time, the luster had worn off.  Broadcasters who were leery of buying AM Stereo equipment in the early 1980s (fearing that it would become obsolete at the whim of the FCC) slowly abandoned interest in the concept by the late 1980s.  However, AM Stereo broadcasts are still conducted by several DFW stations today, and Kahn Communications has recently unveiled a improved system, "Cam-D," which might create a resurgence of interest in AM broadcasting in the future.
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Also in the late 1980s, The FCC decided to extend the AM band to 1710 kHz.  This would allow new investors to start new stations from scratch (as the pool of available frequencies was quickly drying up) and would permit existing restricted-signal stations to move into an uncrowded part of the band and beef up their coverage area.  Automakers and consumer electronics manufacturers began adding the extended band to their units in the early 1990s, and existing stations were permitted to simulcast on their new frequencies beginning in the mid-1990s.  By December, 2007, all simulcasting stations will be required to give up their original frequency and begin broadcasting solely on the new dial position.
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But this is not to say AM is totally dead, or ever will be in Dallas...both WBAP and KRLD ranked in the Top 5 for many decades, according to Arbitron.  Kahn Communications is working on improvements to their original AM Stereo concept.  Ibiquity, another player who is developing solutions to the substandard sound, is currently marketing a digital broadcasting system for AM stations (known as IBOC/HD.)  HD receivers are already being sold, despite limited station participation.


STATIONS:
540
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KDFT, Ferris.  Call letters established 6/9/1986.  Format:  Southern Gospel (1986-90,) Black Christian Gospel (1990-5/18/1998,) Spanish/Ethnic/Spanish Religious (5/18/1998-2004; as "La Poderosa," 2004-present.)  Calls stand for Dallas-Fort Worth Texas.  Owner:  Multicultural Broadcasting ("MRBI," 2004-present; Multicultural bought out all Radio Unica stations after Unica went bankrupt in 2003.)  Former owners: Way Broadcasting (bought 4/19/2000,) Freedom Network, Radio Unica.  Nickname:  "La Poderosa," "Gospel 540."  Program:  "Mambo Express."  Notables:  Jim Henderson, Ted Sauceman (GM,) Lazaro Saldaña, Wilbert Mejia, Yary Uhing, Luiz Munguia, Juan Benitez, Sara Treviño.  Once applied for change of license city to DeSoto.  Station located at 7469 S. Westmoreland, then Red Bird Mall (to 10/2005,) then to 5801 Marvin D. Love Frwy (10/2005-present.)

KLCA, Ferris.  Station established 4/16/1986.  Temporary calls for KDFT, above.

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570
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KLIF, Dallas.  Call letters re-established 11/29/1990.  Format:  Talk/News.  Owners:  Susquehanna, Cumulus.  Station named for its original location in the Oak Cliff section of Dallas.  Station moved from its 43-year home at 1190 AM on 11/29/1990, although it was simulcast on both frequencies until 12/6/1990. Broadcasts in stereo.  First radio station in the world to simulcast on the internet.  Network affiliation:  NBC.  Program:  Talknet (syndicated talk show programming,) "Weekend Workout," "Love, Sex and Relationships," "The Skip Bayless Show," "The Gary Cogill Show,"  "The Deborah Norville Show" (via satellite, 1991.)  Notables:  Terese Arena (ND; hired away from a long stint at KRLD in 2003,) Martin Birnbach, Ed Busch, Freddie Mertz (1992,) David Gold (to 1997; known as "The Conservative Freight Train,") Bob Ray Sanders, Norm Hitzges, Dr. Lynn Weiss, Skip Bayless (host of the "Skip Bayless Show,") Dr. Ann Wildemann (host of "Love, Sex and Relationships,") Gary Cogill, Chuck Schechner, Mark Woolsey aka Mark Elliott (1985-1991; 1996-1999; currently a senior broadcast meteorologist for The Weather Channel in Atlanta,) Jim Long, Dan Bennett, Jon Griffin, Lora Cain, Dave Cradick aka Kidd Kraddick (brief fill-in only during 5/1992 after firing at KEGL-FM,) Kevin McCarthy (to 2001,) Benjamin Dover, Mike Fisher, Val DeOrr, Baylor Witcher (2004-2005,) Tom Kamb (2000-2001,) "Humble" Billy Hayes, Scott Anderson, Jeff Bolton, Joe Kelley (2000-01,) Dr. Laura Schlessinger (via satellite, began 1/7/2002,) Neal Boortz, Leon Simon, Chris Myers, Darrell Ankarlo, Ed Budanauro, Ron De Roxtra (known as Ron Barr during his ten years at KRLD-AM,) John Shomby (1993,) Tim Vasquez (traffic,) Bill Jackson (traffic, 2005-present,) Jim Reeves, Steve Coryell, Brian Wilson.
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE

Special thanks to Susquehanna senior VP Dan Halyburton for providing me with a copy of the book, "Susquehanna Radio:  The First Fifty Years," which provided otherwise unfindable answers to the history of post-McLendon KLIF and Susquehanna's presence in the DFW market...thanks, Dan!

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KKWM, Dallas.  Call letters established 1/9/1990.  Format:  Light Rock.  Owner:  Anchor Media.  Nickname:  "Warm 97.9."  Simulcasted sister station KKWM-FM.  Broadcasted Dallas Sidekicks soccer games.  See KKWM-FM for personalities.
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE
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KLDD, Dallas.  Call letters established 1/26/1987.  Format:  Oldies (1/26/1987-12/1989,) Light Rock (12/1989-1/9/1990.)  Nickname:  "K-Oldie."  Owner:  Anchor Media.  Sister station to KZEW-FM.  Broadcasted Plano high school football games.  Notables:  George "Paul" Medina, Randy Coffey, Pete Hamill, Rick Stoughton, Jason Walker, Mike Wade.  KLDD was to have become DFW's first all-sports station in 1/1990 when sister KZEW's format changed; but management decided otherwise.  Station retained the KLDD call letters with the new simulcasted "Warm" format until 1/9/1990 (the temporary legal ID was a mouthful..."The new Warm, 97.9FM... KZEW, Dallas-Fort Worth, KLDD-AM Dallas-Fort Worth.)
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE
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KRQX, Dallas.  Call letters established 7/2/1983.  Format:  Oldies/Classic Rock.  First AM station in DFW to broadcast in AM Stereo (C-QUAM.)  First station in US to be programmed with classic rock.  Nickname:  "K-Rocks."  Owners:  Belo, Anchor Media (1/1/1987 to format change; Anchor was owned by Fort Worth's Bass Brothers, who formerly owned KDNT.)  Sister station to KZEW-FM.  Programs:  "Sunday Blues Program" (1985-87; syndicated as "Blues Deluxe" since 1988,) "Midnight Concert Series." Broadcasted SMU football games.  Notables: George Gimarc (music director and a pioneer of the classic rock format,) Steve Anderson, Bob Corbell aka Mike Channel, Jay Hoker, Dave Johnson (hosted "Sunday Blues Program,") Stan Atkins, Randy Coffey, "Crazy" Dave Otto, Art Reilly, Glenn Mitchell (as fill-in host for "Sunday Blues Program,") Libby Zabriskie, John Elliott.  In an interesting promotion, the station allowed itself to be "hijacked" by the song, "Louie Louie," which it played in a continuous marathon for a weekend.
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WFAA, Dallas-Fort Worth.  Call letters established 6/26/1922 at 833 kc (other sources say 750 kc,) moved to 630 kc on 5/15/1923, moved to 600 kc on 4/15/1927, moved to 550 kc on 11/16/1927, moved to 800 kc on 5/25/1929 (shared with WBAP, and existed only on 800 to 1939,) moved to 600 kc in the late 1930s, moved and merged with KGKO at 570 kc on 5/1/1938 (WBAP's Amon Carter bought KGKO in 1938 as a second frequency for WBAP and WFAA to share; Carter sold half of it to WFAA on 7/26/1940 for $250,000,) moved with WBAP to 820 kc on 3/29/1941 (the national moving day for clear channel stations as a result of the Treaty of Havana.)  Station shared frequencies with WBAP-820 from 1929 to 5/1/1970 to maximize use of 820's clear channel signal (they traded dayparts, and each used the 600 or 570 frequency when the other was using 820 (see KGKO, below.)  Expanded to current 50kW on 5/10/1930 (using transmitter near Grapevine, built in 1929; new tower opened in 1938, and was the tallest man-made structure in the Southwest at the time.)  Original FRC license date was 6/5/1922.  Granted dual-city license on 2/22/1973.  Format:  Variety, Middle of the Road (4/27/1970-?,) Top 40 (?-11/2/1976,) News/Talk.  Owner:  A. H. Belo (Alfred Horatio Belo) Broadcasting.  Call letters stood for "Working For All Alike," and also noted as "World's Finest Air Attraction."  Nickname:  "Newstalk 57" (11/2/1976 to 1983.)  Sister station to KERA-FM (1947 version)/WFAA-FM/ KZEW-FM and the "Dallas Morning News" (formerly "Dallas News and Journal" in WFAA's earliest days.)  First network-affiliated station in Texas (initially with NBC beginning 4/2/1923; later with Texas Quality Network, ABC [to 8/1/1975] and CBS thereafter,) first US station to carry educational programs, first to produce a serious radio drama series, first to air a state championship football game, the first to air inaugural ceremonies.  Original personalities for the station were drawn from columnists and editors at sister "Dallas Morning News."  The phrase, "Shut 'er down, Eddie!", was the nightly signoff indicator.

Programs:  "Early Birds" (premiered 3/31/1930; hosted by John Allen with entertainment by Lynn Hoyt, Katy Prince, Frances Beasley, Terry Lea, Louise Mackey and Dale Evans [yes, THE Dale Evans!  Pre-Roy Rogers, she was married to piano player Frank Butts]), "Hymns We Love" (began in 1952 and moved to KAAM-1310 years later,) "Dramatic Moments in Texas History," "Cadenza" (1940s,) "Radio Frolics" (late 1940s; hosted by Norvell Slater and Dorothy Bell,) "Midnight Nostalgia" (1/27/1974-4/7/1974,) "57 Nostalgia Place" (4/14/1974-10/31/1976,) "Reuben's Record Room," "Farm Report," "Melodic Living," "At Issue" (audience-participation show, began 11/1975,) "Musical Party Line," "Hogan's Hall of Hits," "The Ted Cassidy Show," "Behind the News" (1950-1960,) "Ed Busch Show," "Man Around the House," "Saturday Night Shindig" (began 1944,) "Texans-Let's Talk Texas Hour," "Quiz of Two Cities," "Herb Jepko Nitecap Show" (syndicated,) "Hotline," "Carnival of Music," "Football Scoreboard," "Sports Review" (began 7/5/1948,) "Business News," "Hackberry Hotel" (featuring "Hack Berry," and "Little Willie," played by Ben McClesky," "Saturday Night Shindig," "Mrs. Tucker's Smile" (began 1934,) "Big D Jamboree" (began as "Lone Star Barndance" and "Lone Star Jamboree;" later moved to KRLD,) "Guests and Telephone," "Murphy Martin Commentary," "Saturday Night Shindig," "570 Club," "Clare Lou and M," "Slo-n-Ezy" (an "Amos-n-Andy ripoff,) "Murray Cox RFD."  Station bands:  The Plainsmen Quartet, The Pepper Uppers Orchestra, Step Ladder and the Saddle Tramps, Rangers Quartet, Cass County Boys/Cass County Kids, Bel Canto Quartet, Sandman Soldiers, Bumblebees Trio, Jimmie Jeffries, Elmer Bockman, Ben McClusty, Hack and Willie, Peg "Pegleg" Moreland (male singer known as "King of the Little Ditty.")

Notables: Walter Dealey (spearheaded creation of WFAA,) Bud Buschardt (host of "57 Nostalgia Place" and "Midnight Nostalgia,") Don Cristy, John Allen (employed with WFAA 1945-1981,) Don Norman, Jim Thomas, Lynn Woolley, Dick West (host of "Behind the News," 1950-1960, and an editorial commentary short beginning in 1/1957; concurrently at Dallas Morning News through the 1950s writing editorials, and as Editorial Director, 1960-1977,) Ben Laurie, Doug Fox (1965-66; later spent 29 years in the news department at WFAA-TV,) "Gentleman" Jim Carter, David Garcia, Bob Morrison, Rob Edwards, Kevin McCarthy (1978-1981,) Tom Perryman, Bob Gooding (1960-1961; then anchored for WFAA-TV newscasts 1961-1979,) Terry Lee Jenkins, Ralph "Buddy" Widman (late of KFJZ and KWBC; Sports Director, then Assistant Program Director; hosted "Sports Review" and "Football Scoreboard; began 5/1948; left for SM position at new KBCS-730AM in 7/1957; returned to WFAA-AM in 10/1958,) Bob Bruton, L. B. Henson, Harry Withers, Jack Schell, Bobby Brock (not to be confused with Dallas Times Herald radio/TV columnist Bob Brock,) Charlie Vann, Ralph Robison, Phoebe "Peggy" Patton (hosted a children's program in the 1940s,) Jimmy Jeffries, Ed Hogan (began 1950; hosted "Musical Party Line" and "Hogan's Hall of Hits;" into WFAA-AM sales in 1953; to WFAA-TV as chief announcer in 10/1955,) Norvell Slater  (1941-1972; host of "Hymns We Love,") John Criswell (later news anchor for WFAA-TV and KDFW-TV,) Charles McCord, Marty Haag, Craig Barton, Gene Baudrick, Walter Vaughn, Frank Mills, Eddie Dunn, Dick Syatt, Jim Simon, Charley Wright, Frank Munroe, Adams Calhoun, Bill Hazen, Darrell Monroe (1967-1968,) Paul Hitt (assistant on "57 Nostalgia Place,") Bob Stanford, Randy Coffey, Sharon West, Dave Naugle, Harvey Johnston, Laurel Ornish (1973-1974, news,) Ray Dunaway, Tim Kase, Pierce Allman, Edwin Bryant (as half of "Uncle Ed and Little Willie" duo,) Roy Newman (staff musician,) Ann Berry, Jim Boyd, Ed Busch, Jim Simon (news and operations director, 11/1976-1977; brought in from KABC-Los Angeles to head "Newstalk 57" in November, 1976,) Jess Smith (news and operations director, 1977-1980; replaced Jim Simon,) Joe Holstead (news and operations director, began 1980; replaced Jess Smith; originally was assistant to Smith,) Rob Milford aka Rob Williams (9/1976 to 11/2/1976; last jock to broadcast before turning into "Newstalk 57,") Noah Nelson (later a reporter for KXAS-TV, then NBC News; currently an actor,) Jim Rose (1967-68,) Connie Herrera (1978-81,) Dorothy Bell, Gary DeLaune, John Johnson (as host of "The Farm Report,") Elston Brooks (later an entertainment columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram,) Tony Lawrence, Dan Cutrer, Ted Cassidy (later played "Lurch" on "The Addams Family;" was announcer who helped cover the JFK assassination by conducting witness interviews, and hosted "The Ted Cassidy Show."  Left WFAA for Hollywood in 1964.)

Also Murray Cox (farm reporter and host of "Murray Cox RFD,") Pauline "Polly" Cox (wife of Murray; assisted with show,) Frank Filesi, Jimmy McClain (played the role of "Dr. I. Q.;" became a NW Texas minister in the late 1940s after leaving WFAA-AM; later voice of KIXL's "Think It Over" segments,) Marty Miller (1975,) Rex Cromwell, Bill Crowdus (host of "Man Around the House,") Bob Tripp, Dick Wheeler, Martin B. Campbell, Dave Cooke, Howard Bogarte, Wilbur Ard aka "Deacon," Pat Couch (later a reporter with KXAS-TV,) Roy Cowan, Lynn Bigler, Ken Rundel (as host of "Hotline" and "Guests and Telephone,") Steve Goddard, Ed Busch (as host of "The Ed Busch Show,") Julie Benell, Dave Anthony, Don Thomson, Ken Sasso aka Ken Summers (morning show host in the mid-1970s; famous for character "Guido,") Lee Douglas, Mitch Carr (1980-82,) Terry Bell, Cris Cross, Travis Linn (began 1962; later anchor on WFAA-TV,) Lotie Lofton, Jim Fry (later a reporter for sister WFAA-TV,) Ann McCarthy, Ralph Nimmons (began 1934; assistant manager of station until promotion to Station Manager of WFAA-TV in 12/1950,) K. B. McClure (likely the same person as Ken [Knox] McClure,) Mary Sue (Suzy) McCord, Bob Dahlgren, Jeff Dale aka Mike Millard, Troy Dungan (former WFAA-TV weatherman; weather-watcher for "Early Birds" program as a teen in the 1940s,) Ira Lipson (PD, and concurrently PD of KZEW when KZEW launched,) Arch Campbell, Herb Jepko (as host of "Herb Jepko's Nitecap Show,") Nick Ramsey (as host of "Carnival of Music,") Bill Blanchard (as host of "Business News,") Chuck Murphy, Donald Easterwood, Walter Evans (1959-1964; later anchor with KRLD/KDFW-TV,) Jan Isbell Fortune, Jamie Friar, Paul Gleiser (1973; returned 7/1976-4/1982,) Helen Harris, Don Valentine (APD; began 1947,) Peter Molyneaux, Karl Lambertz (1933-1946; returned 2/1952,) Andy Pollin, Greg Maiuro, Marcel Jones, Alex Keese (began 1930; Music Director, Commercial Manager, then General Manager in 1952,) Russell Koch, Tony Lawrence, Bob Etheridge, Ralph Gould (engineer,) Talmadge Naylor, Ted DeHay (began 1932,) Robert S. Pool, Shirley Proctor, Lewis Quince (storyteller,) Russ Rossman, Irene Runnels (National Sales Manager, 1977-1978,) Ruth Salter (whistler,) Joe Salvadore (also with WFAA-TV,) Bob Scott, Kelly Maddox (began 1941; famous stage and radio actor, 1927-1937; worked for NBC Radio thereafter,) Patricia Smith (also with WFAA-TV,) "Sugah," "Superfan," Nick Brounoff aka Nick Alexander (1979-1983,) Bob Tripp, Mary and Tommy Tucker, Murphy Martin (began 1961, host of "Murphy Martin Commentary,") Lydia Hiegert (began 1941,) George Kuesell, Arthur Kuehn, Charlie Van "The Moving Man," George Utley, Denson Walker, Hilda LeBlanc Chase, Tom Brown.  Station initially located in a 9' x 9' tent on the roof of the "Dallas Morning News;" to the Morning News library thereafter; to the Baker Hotel on 10/1/1925; atop the Santa Fe Railroad Warehouse at 1122 Jackson St. from 6/20/1941 to 1961 (the building still has "WFAA" clearly painted on the top today!) and to Communications Center in early 1961.
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KGKO, Wichita Falls (to 6/21/1935,) Fort Worth.  Station established 9/2/1928 in Wichita Falls; moved to Fort Worth on 5/1/1938.  Format:  News.  Owner:  Carter Publications (5/1/1938-7/1940; although initial FCC approval was granted on 9/24/1935, and the city of license was changed at that time, Wichita Falls residents voiced concern over losing the station, taking nearly three years to resolve before KGKO-Fort Worth went on the air,) Carter Publication (50%) and Belo Broadcasting (50%) (7/26/1940- 4/27/1970.)  Network affiliation:  Blue Lone Star Network.  Sister to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper.  KGKO broadcasted WBAP's programs on 570 during the dayparts that WFAA was using the 820 frequency, and vice-versa, beginning on 9/1/1940.  It also rebroadcasted the WFAA News.  On 4/1/1947, the KGKO calls were dissolved per order of the FCC, and each station identified itself as either "WBAP 570" or "WFAA 570."  Station shared studios with WFAA at the Santa Fe Building downtown (see WFAA entry) but also had studios in the Medical Arts Building in Fort Worth.  Programs:  "America's Town Meeting," "Women's World," "Darts for Dough," "Books-New and Old," "Sunshine Boys," "Sunday Recital," "Cross Roads Party," "What am I," "Cowhand Jamboree" (hosted by the "KGKO Hillbillies.")  Network affiliation stayed with each frequency; 570 had ABC (initially "NBC Blue.")  Notables:  Lee Brumm aka Lee Arthur, Craig Barton, Gordon Fitzgerald, John Hicks, Orral Anderson (as host of "Darts for Dough,") Frances Mossiker (as host of "Women's World,") Frank Mills (already at KGKO before Carter Publications bought the station; stayed with Carter's broadcast properties for 41 years!), Fay "Smitty" Smith, Edwin Bryant (as half of "Uncle Ed and Little Willie" duo,) Ernest Tubb (country singer; host of the "Ernest Tubb Show," sponsored by Gold Chain Flour.)  Studios first located at 600/604 Thomas Building, Dallas.  Not related to KGKO-1480.

KTAT, Wichita Falls.  Call letters re-established 1/13/1935.  Briefly traded frequencies with KGKO, as KTAT-1240 was causing interference with WRR's (former) frequency.  KTAT traded back with KGKO on 1/31/1935, as Amon Carter expressed interest in using the frequency as a backup for WBAP/WFAA-820 and moving it into DFW.  See entry at 1270 kc.

KGKO, Wichita Falls.  Station established 9/2/1928.  Began life at 1350 kc, then 1370 kc, before moving to 570.  See details above.
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618.6/833
(360 METERS/485 METERS)
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The following are stations that began and ended before the Federal Radio Commission assigned specific frequencies on November 11, 1928.  The general guideline from the FRC was to broadcast news and weather reports on 833 kc (485 meters) and music on 618.6 kc (360 meters.)  Local stations worked out an agreement to share the frequencies on 7/1/1922, and developed an alternating broadcast schedule for each.

KFFZ, Dallas.  Station established 4/23/1923; off air 1928 (other sources say 6/1923.)  Owner:  Al G. Barnes Amusement Company (circus owner.)  Designated as a portable station.

KFRO, Fort Worth.  Station to have been established 1927, but owner ran out of money to start it up.  License received in 10/1924, with intention to broadcast at 1220 kc.  Call letters stood for "Keep Forever Rolling On."  Owner:  J. R. Curtis.  Curtis salvaged his idea and brought KFRO to Longview, TX in 1935.

WDAO, Dallas.  Station established 8/1921, but didn't sign on until 5/1922; off air 9/1923.  Owner:  Dallas Automotive Electric Company.  Located at 915 S. Ervay, Dallas.  Station was mainly developed to be a showcase for the company's line of Magnavox radios.  Second station in Dallas (after WRR.)

WPA, Fort Worth.  Station established 3/16/1922 (predating WBAP by over a month as the first station in Fort Worth;) off air 5/24/1923.  Format:  Variety.  Nickname:  "Voice of the Southwest."  Owner:  Leonard Withington dba Fort Worth Record (newspaper.)  Notables:  Anna Mae Hopkins, Madeira Manchester, Lorraine Withington (wife of owner,) Mrs. William Bryant, H. H. "Pop" Boone, Bill "Sparks" Pitkin, Jack Webster Harkrider, Jim Allison.  Upgraded to 100 watt transmitter on 4/17/1922.  Located in a shack on the roof of the newspaper building (much like WFAA-AM.)  Station abandoned when Hearst Newspapers bought the Fort Worth Record (the Record was later sold to Amon Carter and became the Star-Telegram.)  In 1924, local preacher J. Frank Norris bought the WPA transmitter and used it to put on KFQB (see entry at 1270.)

Thanks to The Fort Worth Public Library's newspaper clipping archive for most of the above information, and to Richard Schroeder's book, "Texas Signs On" for confirming most of it!


620
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KMKI, Plano.  Call letters established 12/21/1998 (broadcasted under KAAM with this format from 8/1/1998.)  Broadcasts in AM Stereo.  Format:  Children's (ABC Radio's "Radio Disney" format.)  Call letters derived from "Mickey Mouse."  Broadcasts in stereo.  Broadcasts TCU football games.  Owner:  ABC/Disney (bought 9/4/1998 for $12 million.)  Notables:  Kevan "Smokin' B" Browning, Jay Jenson, Tera Beall, Don Crabtree, Susan Huber, Dean Wendt, Kim Stewart, B. B. Good, Lee Cameron, Sherry Rodgers, Brian Huen, Rheagan Wallace, Kevin Miller, Jay Sanchez.  Radio Disney format launched in 4 national markets on 11/18/1996; went nationwide in 6/1997.  Format is based in Dallas at ABC Radio Networks.
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KAAM, Plano.  Call letters re-established 10/31/1995 from 1310 AM.  Format:  Oldies/Big Band/Standards.  Owner:  Collin County Radio (consisting of Jack Sellmeyer [radio engineer; currently owns Sellmeyer Engineering in McKinney,] Hue Beavers and Jaan McCoy, along with 27 other investors, who paid $700,000 for the station.)  Nickname:  "K-Double-AM."  Programs:  "Moments from Texas History," "Charlie the Collector," "Lake Country Jubilee," "Music for Lovers."  Notables:  Jim Lowe (longtime voice of Big Tex at the annual Texas State Fair,) Larry Carolla, Charles Kuenzi aka Johnny Michaels, Teresa Hanson [Burns] (as host of "Music for Lovers;" married to KRLD's Brian Burns,) Irv Jackson aka Jack Bishop, Sandy Singer, Lee Gray, Harold Marshall (host of "Lake Country Jubilee,") Martin Jurow, Christine Stewart, Hue Beavers, Jaan McCoy, Charlie Haggard aka "Charlie the Collector," Dr. June Rayfield Welch (host of "Moments from Texas History.")  License city was moved from Wichita Falls to Plano in 10/1995, with towers relocated to New Hope with a repeater in McKinney. KXEZ-FM was the successor to KAAM, although the KAAM calls and format were again resurrected by another owner/enthusiast in 1999 (see 770 kHz.)
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE
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KWFT, Wichita Falls.  Station established 7/15/1939.  Format:  Country, Soft Rock.  Call letters stood for Wichita Falls, TX.  Dark 12/1994 - 10/31/1995 (although periodic signal testing for KAAM began in 9/1995.)  Owner:  North Texas Radio, Joe Carrigan.  Program:  "Big Six Jamboree."  Notables:  Bill Smith aka Bill Mack (II) (1952-1959,) Joe Tom White, Lynn Bigler.  KWFT calls were resurrected at 990AM in 1995.
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640

KSMU/KPNI, Dallas.  Station established 1949.  Other sources say KSMU began fall, 1947 at 760 kc.  See entry at 89.3 FM for information.

660
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KSKY, Balch Springs.  Station established 9/28/1941.  Format:  Entertainment (1941-1963,) Religious (1963-4/5/2004;) Conservative Talk (4/5/2004 to present; most of the employees and religious programming moved to KKGM-1630 on 4/2/2004; Salem also flipped their WZZD-AM in Philadelphia to Conservative Talk on the same day.)  Nicknames:  "K-Sky," "Voice of the Gospel," "Christian Radio for the New Millenium."  News nickname:  "Five Star Final."  Owners:  Salem Communications, Broadcasting Partners (to 4/1995,) Chilton Radio Corp. (1941-?; renamed Sky Broadcasting) Andy Bell (to 5/1999,) Evergreen/AMFM/Chancellor (4/1995-?.)  Call letters derived from station's location "from the skyroof of the beautiful Hotel Stoneleigh."  Programs:  "In the Groove," "Women's Sports Hour," "Mick Williams Cyber-Line," "Gospel Lighthouse," "Musical SKY-Waves," "Texas Gospel Jubilee," "Revolving Bandstand," "Love of God Hour."  Notables as "Religious":  Nancy "Nan" Burns, Gordon "Double G" Griffin, Larry Shannon, Dexter Andrews, Hector Lariz, Dave Garland, Andrew Cunningham, Jack Davis, James Evans aka "The Alluring Aloysius" (1943-52,) Ray Flowers, Spade Cooley, Luke Rowe, Lon Sosh (sales manager,) Cliff Walker, Bill Clauss, Pete Thomson, Mary Stoddard aka Mary Sanders (1995-1996; hosted a weekly talk show,) Randy Coffey, Leslie Cerny, Dale Berry, David Pitman, Julie Barrett, "Sage," Paula Scott, Cecil Taylor, Jaan McCoy, Bill Simmons, Dan Bradford, Royel Clark, Lee Ellen, H. C. Noah, Donald Skelton, Harry Thompson, Larry Groebe, Bill Bragg (1967-1975,) Mick Williams (host of "Cyber-Line," 1995-7/20/1997,) George Farrar (host of "Love of God Hour.")  Notable as "Conservative Talk":  William (Bill) Bennett (syndicated.)  Texas governor Coke Stevenson inaugurated the station at high noon on September 28, 1941; during the station's "entertainment" format, celebrities such as Jackie Gleason, Skitch Henderson, Vincent Price, Jane Russell, Jack Webb and Charlton Heston visited the station in person and performed live!  KSKY applied for an FM frequency at 106.9 in 1948, turned down a chance to buy the 98.7 frequency in 1957, and was awarded 91.3 in the 1960s (but no proof that they ever signed on has ever been found.)  Station licensed to Dallas to 2003.  Originally daytime-only station.
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700

KHSE, Wylie.  Call letters established 7/22/2004.  Station testing as of 1/2006.  Format:  To have been Business Talk.  Owner:  Dave Schum dba The Watch, Inc. dba Dallas Radio License LLP (now held by "debtor-in-possession" after a 10/2005 auction.)  Persistent rumors had KMSR/KFCD's Talk format eventually moving to 700, while 990 would become a Business/Sports Talk station.  KHSE was long rumored to be in a "testing" phase to align the signal on their new tower, but in reality, a tower had never even been constructed.  Station went bankrupt in 8/2005; sold along with 990 to Schum's largest creditor for $8 million on 10/13/2005.  To have been sister station to KFCD-AM.

KCAF, Wylie.  Second set of call letters parked for 700 AM, on 3/3/2004.

KXXT, Wylie.  Original call letters parked for 700 AM, on 3/4/2003; owner Dave Schum relocated his KCAF calls here on 3/3/2004 when 990 became KMSR.



730
.

KKDA, Grand Prairie.  Call letters established 1/25/1969.  Format:  Easy Listening (2/16/1969-4/27/1970,) Black Talk/Urban Music (4/27/1970-5/23/2012,) R&B via national network (5/23/2012-1/1/2013,) Korean language (1/1/2013-present.)  Nicknames:  "Sunny" and "The Dawn of a New Day" (as easy listening,) "Soul 73," "Soul Sockin' 73," "You've Got a Friend."  Owners:  Republic Broadcast Corporation (8/1968-1971; Texas Lt Governor Ben Barnes was part owner, along with Alan Feld and Richard Gump [Dallas attorneys,] Dee Kelly [campaign manager for Ben Barnes' 1966 bid for Lt Governor, and was on the board of former station owner KPCN] and Charlie Payne [former McLendon PD;]) Hyman Childs dba Service Broadcasting (1971-2013,) Richard Kim dba SKR Partners (2013-present; bought for $1.9 million.)  Network affiliation:  ABC's American Information Network (1969-1970.)  Program:  "Just Jazz," "Speak Out," "Talking About Sports," "Reporter's Roundtable," "Talk Back." Notables as Urban:  Linwood "Cuzzin' Linnie" Henderson, Willis Johnson aka "Willis The Crooner 'Where IS the Party' Johnson" (1976-12/31/2012; took over morning show in 1979; did advice feature "Dear Crooner,") Iola Johnson (began 3/1990; currently KTVT-TV anchor and former WFAA-TV anchor; in 1973 was first black TV anchor in DFW market,) Lynne Haze (1980-1990,) Harvey Martin (former Dallas Cowboys player from 1973-1984,) Roger Boykin, Roger B. Brown aka "Roger B" (to 5/23/2012; Fort Worth Star-Telegram sports reporter; host of "Talking about Sports,") Gyna Bivens, Shaun Rabb (concurrently KDFW-TV anchor,) Louis White aka "Da Wolf," (began 1987; black DJ who fashioned his radio voice around Wolfman Jack; concurrently a teacher at Dallas' Lincoln High School,) Millie Jackson (R&B singer who had a hit with "Love Don't Come Around Here No More" in the 1970s,) David Bradshaw, Ernie Johnson (to 5/23/2012,) R.L. Griffin (to 5/23/2012,) Al "TNT" Braggs, John Lott, Roland Martin, C. Boyd Kelly, Ray Weathers, Jim Howell, Willie Culton, Tony Price, Ron Alexander, Bill Thomas, Dewayne Dancer, Art Riley (1970-1973,) Bob Collins, Tony Lawrence, Phil Van Stavern aka Phil Todd, Chuck Smith (PD for soul format,) Irene Runnels (sales manager,) Bill Mack (I), Spike Jackson, Steve Ladd aka "The Doctor," David Starr (MD,) Joycelyn Johnson, Maryellen Hicks (Fort Worth judge, host of "Speak Out,") Ron Davis, Noah Nelson (later a reporter for KXAS-TV, then NBC News; currently an actor,) Jailynn Thornton, Johnnie Taylor (Dallas-based R&B singer who had the first ever RIAA-certified platinum single with "Disco Lady" in 1976,) Ernie Johnson, Paul Turner, Bobby Patterson (to 5/23/2012,) Joe Bagby, Gary Faison aka "Babyfase," "Cindy B" (to 5/23/2012,) Cheryl Smith (host of "Reporter's Roundtable,") John Wiley Price (Dallas County Commissioner; host of "Talk Back.") Notables as "Sunny":  Tony Lawrence, Irene Runnels (director and GM,) Eddie Craig (last jock on KPCN and first on KKDA; defected to KBUY two days later.)  Station was daytime only until 1990.
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE
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KPCN, Grand Prairie.  Call letters established 5/19/1962.  Format:  Country and Western.  Call letters stood for "Park Cities News."  Owner:  Radio KPCN, Inc (headed by Giles Miller Sr and Dee Kelly, to 8/1968,) Republic Broadcast Corporation (8/1968 into KKDA; bought for $422,455.)  Notables:  Joe Fuchs aka Jay Weaver, Giles Miller Sr (SM,) Giles Miller Jr aka Ed Milton/Ed Miller (ND,) David Day, Jack Darden, Bill Smith aka Bill Mack (II) (1966-10/1967; late of KCUL-AM,) Eddie Craig (1968-1/25/1969; last jock to broadcast on KPCN,) "Big" Al Turner (1963,) Thomas Shelby Brown aka Randy Ryder (defected to KYAL-1600 after format change in 1969,) Joe Bagby, Bo Powell, Jim Rose, Mac Curtis, Jim "Shootin'" Newton, Bill Bragg (1966-1967,) George Slocum, Russ Johnson, Tom Rippey, Kyle Gay, Dick Morrison, Buddy Harris, Horace Logan, Arnold Poovey aka "Texas Joe" Poovey aka "Groovey Joe Poovey" aka Johnny Dallas.  KPCN owners made a deal with Gordon McLendon to purchase KNUS-FM in 1967; the deal fell through that June, and KNUS went to non-simulcast programming (of sister KLIF) thereafter...and the rest is ratings history!  The new station was to become KPCN-FM and simulcast KPCN-AM.  When KPCN switched to KKDA and an easy listening format in 1969, country listeners were directed via commercials to try KYAL-AM; dropping C&W music was attributed to the runaway success of competitor KBOX and their country format.  Daytime-only station.
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KRZY, Grand Prairie.  Call letters established 10/20/1960.  Nickname:  "Crazy."  Format:  Black/Rhythm and Blues.  Owner:  Rounsaville of Dallas (bought for $300,000.)  Rounsaville had to divest of heritage Atlanta station WQXI to buy KRZY.  Notables:  George Truehart, Cal Druxman, Robert Rounsaville.  Daytime-only station.
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KKSN, Grand Prairie. Call letters established 9/1/1959.  Nickname:  "Kissin'."  Owner:  John "Buck" Buchanan dba Kissin' Radio Inc. (9/1/1959-1960.)  Format:  Top 40, with Rhythm and Blues (afternoons, 1959-60,) R&B (1960; jock Don Logan says, "We made some respectable numbers the third quarter of 1959, but the station changed formats to Black, because there was no beating KLIF and KBOX.")  Notables:  Don Logan aka Jesse James (as jock) and aka Jess Huntley (as newscaster,) Joe Bagby, Tony Davis (late of KGKO-1480,) Father J. Von Braun (conducted religious programming on weekends,) Rudy Runnels aka King Arthur (PD.)  Located at the Cliff Towers Hotel, 329 Colorado, in the Oak Cliff section of Dallas.  Daytime-only station.
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KBCS, Grand Prairie.  Station established 8/3/1957 (applied for license 1/1955; granted 2/27/1957.)  Owner:  Earl Bodine and Anson Brundage dba Three Cities Radio (fought for three years with two other applicants to get 730 frequency,) C. R. Sargent (mayor of Grand Prairie.)  Format:  Top 40.  Nickname:  "Your Radio Companion, Serving the Golden Triangle with The Best in Music and the Latest News" (the "Golden Triangle" consisted of Grand Prairie, Arlington and Irving.)  Flagship station for the Arlington State College (now UTA) Rebels; also provided 7-AAAA high school sports broadcasts.  Programs:  "The Bob Bruce Show," "Sunrise Variety Show."  Notables:  Earl Bodine (co-owner and engineer,) Anson Brundage (co-owner and ND,) Ralph "Buddy" Widman (SM, who told reporters at the station's sign-on that, "This will be no 'hick' station;" Widman was late of WFAA-AM/TV; returned to WFAA-AM in 10/1958;) Wes Ellis, "Dandy" Don Logan (1959; continued into KKSN,) Chuck Wallace, Bob Bruce (host of "The Bob Bruce Show,") Dennis Bruton, David Hultsman, Joe Bagby (who says he started at the station in 1955 at age 17, but records show KBCS not going on the air until 1957.)  Located at the Hancock Building at 109 W. Main St in Grand Prairie (initially was to be at the Lennox Hotel, but changed at the last moment,) then to studios constructed at the transmitter site on Beatty Road, south of Grand Prairie, in 2/1959.  Broadcasted with 500 watts.  Daytime-only station.
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740
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KACE, Dallas.  Unknown station date (had active CP during 1950 and 1951; deleted by 1952; cannot confirm that station ever signed on.)  Owner:  Texas Star Broadcasting.

760
.
KUTA, Arlington.  Unknown station date.  Campus station for the University of Texas-Arlington.

And separately, serving the Dallas market:

KSMU, Dallas.  Station established fall, 1947.  Other sources place it at 640 kc.  See entry at 89.3 FM.


770
.
KAAM, Garland.  Call letters re-established 11/1/1999.  Nickname:  "Legends 77", "K-Double A-M," "Where the Legends Live."  Owner:  Crawford Broadcasting (to 2007,) Don Crawford Jr dba DJRD Broadcasting (2007-present.)  Format:  Oldies/Big Band/Adult Standards.  Call letters stand for "Keep Absolutely Awesome Music" (a backronym.)  Broadcasts in stereo.  Programs:  "Sunday Night Bandstand," "Big Band Bash," "The Breakfast Club," "Saturday Sock Hop," "Sinatra and Friends."  Notables: Ken "Hubcap" Carter, Linda Martin, Jaan Kalmes aka Jaan McCoy (PD and host of "The Breakfast Club,") "Deacon" Don Evans (holdover from KPBC-770,) Hermann Bockelmann, Tammy Dombeck, Steve Simmons (with KPBC-770 1990-99; returned to 770 in 2002,) Bill MacCormick aka Bill Dennis (1976-present; PD; began with Crawford at KPBC-1040AM,) Eddie Hubbard, Joe Lacina, Jack Carlisle, Jack Davis (was concurrently PD for KKGM-1630,) "Willie B," Charles Kuenzi aka Johnny Michaels, Chuck Brinkman (2006-present; hired after an 18-year stay at KLUV,) Jerry Overton, Tori Logan, Tom Goodridge, "Cruisin'" Al Taylor (as host of "Saturday Sock Hop,") Ray Van Steen, Don Keyes, Dick Roth aka Dick Marshall, Dave Mitchell, Irv Jackson aka Jack Bishop (to 2006,) Bill Bailey, Cary Richards (as host of "Sinatra and Friends," "Big Band Bash" and "Sunday Night Bandstand.")  3rd incarnation for KAAM and this format (see entries at 1310 and 620.)
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE
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KPBC, Garland.  Station established and call letters re-established 7/1990 (from 1040 AM.)  Format:  Religious, Christian Country (began 3/1992.)  Nickname:  "The Witness".  Call letters stood for Percy B. Crawford, original owner of Crawford Broadcasting.  Owner:  Don Crawford dba Crawford Broadcasting.  Program:  "Talk from the Heart," "Power Jam."  Notables:  Gordon Griffin, Steve Simmons (1990-99; continued with KAAM-770,) Jaan McCoy, Bill MacCormick aka Bill Dennis (1976-present; PD; began with Crawford at KPBC-1040AM,) Chris Goodwin (host of "Power Jam,") Jack Davis, Theda Holmes (host of "Talk from the Heart,") "Deacon" Don Evans (1990-99; continued into KAAM-770.)  Licensed to Garland in 1979, the frequency laid dormant until several companies expressed an interest in the mid-1980s; Century Broadcasting was the top competitor for the FCC license for 770 in 1984, but five years passed before Crawford Broadcasting won out and put a station on the air.
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790

KNNV350, Ovilla.  Low-power station broadcasting city of Ovilla information.


820
.
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WBAP, Fort Worth.  Station established 5/2/1922, although the station was on the air, unlicensed, a few months prior to May, 1922.  Format:  News/Talk (11/1993-present,) Country ("Country Gold," 8/15/1970-11/1993,) Adult Standards ("Good Music," 1960s,) Variety/Music (1922-1960s.)  Nickname:  "NewsTalk 820," "Radio 820," "A Favorite in Texas for a Quarter of a Century" (1947.)  Owners:  Amon Carter dba Carter Publications, Capital Cities/ABC (1974-present [merged with ABC in 1986.])  Network affiliation:  ABC ("NBC Blue,") NBC.  Sister station to WBAP-FM (simulcasted AM programming to it in the 1950s,) later renamed KSCS-FM.  Broadcasts in stereo.  Claims to be first radio station in Fort Worth, but was actually beaten by the Fort Worth Press's WPA-AM by a month (however, it does hold the record for longest tenure of any station in Texas with the same call letters.)  Began life at 833 kc with 5 watts of power (some sources say 10 watts,) increased to 1.5kW in 1923, moved briefly to 750/618.6 kc, then to 630 kc on 5/12/1923, to 600 kc on 4/15/1927, to 800 kc on 11/11/1928 (shared with KTHS, Hot Springs, AR until 1929; KTHS later shared time with KRLD at 1040 kc,) to 10kW in 1929, then to its current 50kW in 1932, and relocated to 820 kc on 3/29/1941 (the national moving day for clear channel stations as a result of the Treaty of Havana; WBAP had become a clear channel, "Big 8" station in 1932 [meaning no other station in the nation could use that same frequency unless they were VERY low power; as a result, WBAP can be heard across a reported 42 states, especially at night.  Seven other stations in the US still carry this same type of distinction on other AM frequencies.]  The former 800 kc position was reassigned as a Mexico clear channel instead.)  Station shared frequencies with WFAA-AM from 1938 to 4/27/1970 to maximize use of 820's signal (they traded dayparts; the strike of a cowbell signaled the switch from one station to the other!  It was the longest-lasting timeshare agreement in history.)  See entry at WFAA-AM for more details.

Call letters stand for "We Bring A Program" (nickname was suggested by former president Herbert Hoover, then with the Federal Radio Commission [pre-FCC;] jokesters used to say, "We Bore All People," and, during Prohibition, "We Bring A Pint.")  First US station to establish a country music variety show broadcasting a la "Grand Ole Opry."  Flagship station for Texas Rangers baseball (1973-1994,) Dallas Mavericks basketball, University of Texas sports, Baylor University sports, and The Dallas Grand Prix (auto race in 1984.)  Nicknames:  "Newstalk 820," "Country Gold" (1970-81,) "Country Music and a Whole Bunch More" (1981.)  Programs: "Today in Texas," "Helen's Home," "Harris and Company," "Black Night" (began 11/5/1937; a theater-of-the-mind horror program; see notes below,) "Sports at Six," "Variety in Rhythm," "Saturday Morning Roundup," "Metroplex Forum," "Good Morning Texas," "Metroplex Perspective," "Cyber-Line," "Computers for the Rest of Us," "Young Americans Club," "Chem Terry Show," "One Man's Opinion," "Sugar Cane and February," "Monitor;" early programming broadcasted from WBAP's initial affiliation with ABC aka NBC-Blue included "Hop Harrigan," "Tom Mix," "Ralston Roundup," "The Lone Ranger," "Inner Sanctum," "One Man's Family."  Early days also consisted of broadcasting church services, news, weather, music request shows (WBAP was the pioneer of this,) church choir concerts, bedtime stories, local music, and even fire department calls!  (Much like WRR-AM in Dallas.)  First regularly-scheduled newscast presented on 7/10/1935.  Commercial-free for several years in the 1920s.  Station band:  The Chuck Wagon Gang.

Notables: Marv Sparks (producer and announcer; worked concurrently at WBAP-TV; currently GM of the 14-station CDR Radio Network in the Ohio Valley,) Harold Hough (known as "H. H.," as the custom in the early days was to identify by initials only; he soon took the nickname "Hired Hand,") Joe Holstead, Don Harris (I) (1965-1981; host of "Harris and Company," returned to WBAP from KLIF-1190 by 1983 and retired 1/2/1998,) Doug Helton, Porter Randall (longtime voice of TSN News via KFJZ-AM,) Glenn "Uncle Hank" Craig, Gene Reynolds, Jim Vinson, Ben Harrover, James Calloway, Givens Campbell "Cam" Arnoux (manager, 1920s,) Ed Olds (engineer, 1920s,) Gordon Fitzgerald, Chem Terry, Layne Beaty, Gene Baugh, Lee Woodward (brother of actor Morgan Woodward,) Ted Graves, Tyler Cox, Rick Hadley (ND,) Frank "Dink" Dinkins, Phil Wygant (husband of WBAP/KXAS entertainment reporter Roberta "Bobbie" Wygant,) Hal Thompson, Frank Mills (concurrently with WBAP/KXAS-TV; logged 41 years with the stations before retiring,) James "Jim" Byron (became news director in 1944 and was later ND for WBAP-TV; began career with Carter Publications as an unpaid reporter for the "FW Star-Telegram" in the 1930s,) Sally Francis, Francis "February" Quinn, Frank "Great Lover" McMordie, John "Uncle Oscar" Jordan, Conrad "Master of Ceremonies" Brady, Jack Amlung (MD,) Captain M. J. Bonner (hosted a "Grand Ole Opry"-styled variety show that began on 1/4/1923,) David DuPont, Neil Hackett, Dick Risenhoover (longtime Texas Rangers announcer; see Dick's bio here,) Helen Risenhoover (wife of Dick; assisted with his morning radio reports,) Ray Whitworth aka Ray Kennedy (traffic, and as producer of "The Midnight Cowboy Trucking Network,") Ted Gouldy, Alex Burton, Tom Whelan, Grace New (first radio/TV beat reporter, and a female to boot!), John Rook, Mike Hoey, Doug Adams (later in management with KXAS-TV; was newsman for Bill Mack's show,) Ron Gray, Don Norman, Tony Lawrence, Harold Taft (concurrently WBAP/KXAS-TV weatherman,) Milton Brown (as station's orchestra leader for "Milton Brown and His Musical Brownies.")

Also Bill Smith aka Bill Mack (II) ("The Midnight Cowboy;" began first tour in 2/1969; left station for good on 3/31/2001; although station format was "Good Music" in the 1960s, Mack played Country overnight, and the station eventually changed formats to match; Mack voted Texas' #1 Country DJ, 1971-2001; Mack wrote the hit country song, "Blue," for LeeAnn Rimes in 1997; Mack moved his show to XM on 9/10/2001,) Don Day, Scott Crowder (to 3/31/2008,) Denis Martyn (2003-2004; was longtime McLendon-esque newscaster at KOY-AM, Phoenix,) Mike Hambrick (2005; former KTVT anchor-turned-Washington activist; brother of KDFW's Judd Hambrick,) Sandy Beach, Norwood McLendon, Mark Davis (began 3/28/1994,) Dan Potter (1986-8/2006,) Dick Siegel (1/1981-11/2002; came from KPLX-FM with Hal Jay,) Rick Roberts, Harroll Harbuck aka Hal Jay (1/26/1981-present; longtime morning show host; Jay hosted BOTH the morning and afternoon drive programs from 1981-94; was also PD from 1/1981-8/1981; "Jay" comes from early in his career, where he worked with his father, Hal Harbuck Sr, at the same station..."J" was short for "junior,") Joe Stroop, Hugh Savage aka "Heywood U-Sue-Me" (character on Hal Jay's morning show, 1997-2002; moved to KFWR-FM,) Sean Chastain, Randy Galloway (1984-2003; host of "Sports at Six;" show moved to sister KESN-FM in 2003; concurrently sportswriter for the "Fort Worth Star-Telegram,") Steve Lamb (1/31/1986-present; married to former WBAP reporter and current KXAS-TV reporter Deborah Ferguson,) Randy Williams, Suzanne Calvin (1995-1996,) Ellen Gallagher, Freddie Mercer, Earl McDonald, Anthony Hennes, Kathryn Reynolds, Gary Smith (1969-1973,) Marion Allen, Peter Molyneaux, Muriel Sprowles, Bud Sherman, Bob Crowley (to 3/10/2009,) Bryan Lundberg (currently with KTRH-AM, Houston,) Eileen Flake, Jim Hill, Herb Southern, Dave Dogular, Dave Burns, Merl Tucker, Rick Hill, Ray Coday Jr aka Ray Lincoln, Frank Parrish, George Cranston, Allen Sciaia, Randy Hames (currently "Irving Harrigan" on KILT-Houston,) Kerry Alford aka Jimmy Stewart, G. L. Ausmus, Dorothy Compere Woodfin, Mark Holtz (Texas Rangers announcer, 1981-1994,) Al Wisk (currently a Dallas attorney and formerly the LA Rams announcer,) Mel Dacus, Amy Chodroff, Bob Mills, Layne Beaty, Larry Fitzgerald, David Daniel, Jack Brown (concurrently with WBAP-TV,) David Perkins aka Charlie Brown (1970,) Susan Darwin (married to former KSCS manager Dean James,) Mark Wainwright, Chuck Cooperstein, Bill Hix, Brad Wright (concurrently KXAS-TV anchorman,) Jim Baker, Tonya Blankenship (2003-2004; left for KRLD-AM and returned briefly to WBAP in 2005,) Cathy Martindale, Deborah Ferguson (concurrently with KXAS-TV news; married to WBAP sports anchor Steve Lamb,) Steve Cumming (1995-3/2004.)

Also Pat Halverson (1940s; "Texaco Star" reporter,) Michael Moser aka Michael T. Parker (began 2002,) Jimmy Kerr  (1946-1971,) Grace Robinson, Bob Shomper (left 2006,) Ben Laurie, Alyce Caron (former KXAS-TV news anchor,) Dave Dumas, Bruce Neal, Jim Brady, David Allen, Joe Kelley (2001-2007; co-host of "Midnight Trucking Show,") Elbert Haling, Hal Collins (host of "One Man's Opinion,") Norvell Slater, Freda Ross-Findley (late of KETR-FM,) James Alderman (began 1931,) Fil Alvarado (later with KDFW-TV,) Jeff Austin aka Jeff Allen (traffic,) Don Thompson, Mark Lambert, Blaine Brooks (traffic, 2002-2005,) Alan Barnes (traffic, 2002-6/30/2009,) Becky Chavaria, Hal Chestnutt, Bill Coates, Hal King (concurrently an Irving police officer,) Steve Coryell, Carl Cramer, Jeremy Procter-Smith aka Jeremy Charles (traffic, 2003-2005,) Jack Dillon, Steven "Stubie" Doak (2003-present; late of KCAF,) Dee Elliott, Al Fasel, Bob Forester, John Hare (now president of ABC Radio,) Norm Hitzges, Breck Harris (also with WBAP-TV,) James Hawthorne (1984-1985,) Ellie Hogue, David Yates, Laura Houston (1992-present) and Monty Cook (2001-present) (longtime husband-wife traffic reporters on the station,) Nancy Johnson, Guy "Curly" Woodward, Sheb Wooley (1946-49; country singer; hosted music show sponsored by Calumet Baking Powder,) "Maurice" aka "Brother Pink Nose," Jim Baker, Mike Jacobs, Dan Lewis (to 2009,) Dale "Pee Wee" Woodward, Cecil Knight (longtime traffic reporter for KPRC-Houston,) Martha Martinez, Kevin McCarthy, John McCarty aka John Reid, Gary McNamara, Bill Merrill, Jim Miklaszewski (currently with NBC News,) Maria Miller (traffic, to 2007,) Russell Scott (traffic,) Dave Barnett, Dan Flanagan, Ben Ortega aka Ben Martin (traffic, 2005-present,) "Catfish" Jim Prewitt (traffic, 2002-1/19/2004,) Mary Ann Razzuk (currently with WFAA-TV,) Jim Reeves, Art Riley (last jock to flip switch on timeshare arrangement with WFAA on 4/27/1970,) Dick Yaws (began 1964 [other sources say May, 1970;] concurrently Fort Worth police sergeant to 1973; hosted "Good Morning Texas,") Jim Ryan, John Scott (to 6/30/2009,) Mike Shannon (II) (traffic, 5/22/2003-6/30/2009,) Allen Stone (longtime Dallas Mavericks announcer and sports director at KDFW-TV,) John Waelti, Jerry Walker, A. M. Whitford (PD, late 1950s,) Mick Williams (host of "Cyber-Line" [7/27/1997-2001] and "Computers for the Rest of Us,") Del Sharbutt (best known as voice of Campbell Soup's "Mmm Mmm Good"!), Scott Hodges (1970,) Tony Williams (traffic, to 2003,) Debbie Alcocer aka Debbie Douglas, Danny Moffat (traffic,) Nancy Jay, Rusty "Rush" Limbaugh (via satellite; trained for radio at Dallas' Elkins Institute in the late-1960s!)   Station located on the 22nd floor of the Blackstone Hotel (1930s,) at Broadcast Hill (rear of 3900 Barnett St, 1948-1994,) and at 2221 East Lamar St in Arlington (1994-date.)
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE

MISC WBAP TIDBITS...
Richard Schroeder's book, "Texas Signs On," is an invaluable resource on the history of WBAP radio and TV; much of the early information here was derived from it.  A must-read!

Frank Mills, who began at WBAP in the summer of 1936, relates a story of how he and college friend Ronald Reagan were en route to Hollywood to "become stars," and made a stop-over in Fort Worth.  Mills decided to check out the local job market, and was offered a position with KGKO, then one with WBAP.  Reagan opted to finish the journey to California by himself, and the rest is history!  (Thanks to former WBAP anchor Ward Andrews for this trivia tidbit.)

"Black Night," a 1937-38 theater-of-the-mind horror program, was a 30-minute, WBAP-produced nighttime drama consisting of mostly Edgar Allan Poe horror story re-enactments, complete with sound effects and eerie narrations.  Each show was preceded with the following warning:  "Any person with a weak heart or weak stomach is advised to switch the dial or take the consequences."  Notables working in or on the show (some were part of "The WBAP Players") included June Harrison, Nelson Olmstead, Harry Hoxworth, Ken Douglas, A. M. Woodford, Morris Steinberg, Virginia Wiltten (writer who adapted Poe's and other stories for radio,) Johnny Sullivan, and music by Gene Baugh's orchestra and Don Gillis.  (Thanks to historian Karl Schadow for all the research on this; if you have any more information or details about the "Black Night" program, contact Karl at bluecar91@hotmail.com.)

WBAP was the first station in the area to broadcast in stereo, albeit in an unconventional way.  One channel was broadcast over WBAP-AM, with the other over WBAP-FM, creating a true stereo effect to those listeners who had two radios to pick up both frequencies!  Bill Barclay and Lee "Woody" Woodward were the hosts of this broadcast in the 1950s; Woodward says, "I don't recall that it generated a lot of talk, but it was the first."

Before venturing into the radio business, owner Amon Carter told his circulation manager at the Star-Telegram, Harold Hough, that, "if this radio thing is going to be a menace to newspapers, maybe we had better own the menace!"  When asked about possible start-up costs, Hough told Carter, "We can get the transmitter for $200, and it shouldn't cost more than $50 to set it up."  Carter replied, "All right.  We'll put $300 into this radio thing, and when that's gone, we're out of the radio business."  That was over 80 years ago now, and Carter's investment proved to be a wise one!

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850

KJON, Carrollton.  Call letters established 5/15/1997 in Anadarko, OK; station itself established 2/17/1970.  Went dark and moved into Dallas market 6/10/2003 and requested call letters KRPT.  Station was rumored to be Brokered Asian format, but signed on with Tropical/News/Talk format on 5/3/2004, then to Spanish Catholic (10/2/2006-present; a mixture of talk and music.)  Nickname:  "La Promesa," "La Brava," "Super Tejano," "DFW's Best Tejano," "Metro-Wide with Tejano Pride."  Owner:  BP DFW, Guadalupe Radio Network.  Broadcasts with 5,000 watts.  Daytime-only station. Simulcasted KFJZ-870 (see below.)  Currently sister station of KATH-910AM.

870
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KFJZ, Fort Worth.  Call letters re-established 1/20/1984 (calls and format moved from 1270 AM.)  Format:  Big Band/Standards (officially "Al Ham's Music of your Life" [formerly at KFJZ-1270]) (1/20/1984-2/28/1986; moved to KAAM-1310,) Spanish (2/28/1986-10/1/2006,) Spanish Catholic (10/2/2006-present.)  Simulcasted with KJON-850 to 9/30/2006.  Nickname:  "La Pantera" ('The Panther,') "Super Tejano," "DFW's Best Tejano," "Metro-Wide with Tejano Pride."  Owner:  Garden City Broadcasting.  Programs:  "Voice of Texas," "Little Panthers." Notables as "Spanish":  Pancho Pistolas, David Cruz (host of "Voice of Texas;" show moved from KESS-1270.)  Notables as "Big Band/Standards":  Howard Greenblatt (ND, public service director and personality,) Rhett Caraway, Scott Reese, Gary Reid, John McCarty, Ray Edwards, David Faulkner.  Station filed bankruptcy in 2/1994, but still remains on the air today.  Daytime only station.
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KJIM, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 2/25/1957.  Format:  MOR, Country, Big Band (1950s and 1970s.)  Owners (in order:)  Blue Bonnet Broadcasting (2/25/1957-4/1/1958,) Bill Schueler and actor Jimmy Stewart dba Trinity Broadcasting (Trinity changed from the KCNC calls to something 'more catchy,')  (4/1/1958-12/31/1962,) W. E. "Bill" Windsor (12/31/1962-?; bought AM and FM outlets for $300,000,) Kurt Meer dba Dalworth Broadcasting (bought in 1967 after selling off KCUL-AM/FM,) Everett Salley, C. D. Salley, Broadcasting Consultants Corp. (1/1/1970-?.)  Sister station to KJIM-FM/KFWT-FM and KFWT-TV until 5/1/1966, when AM was sold.  Network affiliation:  MBS.  Nicknames:  "The Sound of Good Music," "KJIM Kountry."  Program:  "Love of God Hour."  Notables:  Glenn "Uncle Hank" Craig, Jim "Shootin'" Newton, Arnold Poovey aka "Texas" Joe Poovey aka "Groovey" Joe Poovey, Bob Bruton, Russ Bloxom (1959-1961,) Bill Hix, Ben Toney, Morgan Choat, Brad Wilson, Ray Weathers, Cal Druxman (GM,) Bill Crable, Jim Rose aka Jim Nelson (1973-1974; Rose worked concurrently for KFJZ-AM,) Dennis Turner, Jimmy Birdsong, Gene Hatton, Ben Smith, "Babblin'" Bob Bick, Walt Jones, Darrell Monroe (ND,) George Faulder, Andy Anderson, Terry Beene (creator of the Terry Awards,) George Farrar (host of "Love of God Hour" [show later moved to KSKY.])  KJIM's mobile studio was a two-man trailer called "Big Jim," made in the shape of an 8' microphone!  Station located at 2212 East 4th Street in Fort Worth.  KJIM lives...see 1500 AM below.
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KCNC, Fort Worth. Station established 2/15/1947.  Format:  Variety.  Owner:  Ray Collins, Blue Bonnet Broadcasting (and one source cites Pat Boone as having partial ownership in the late 1950s.)  Programs:  "Milk Bucket Brigade," "What's New," "Mainly for Women," "Home Fashions in Melody," "Melody Time," "Western Express," "KCNC Radio Playhouse," "Disc n' Date," "Gordon Fitzgerald Show," "Blues at Sundown."  Notables:  Bob Bruton, Joe Wills, Jerry Hahn, Don Boles, Robert "Little Richard" Smith (first black jock in Fort Worth,) Walt Jones, Jack Raymond, Tom Ellis, Ken McClure aka Ken Knox, William Keck, "Great Scott," Luther Adkins aka Jim Bradley (PD, commercial manager and jock,) Willie Nelson (later a C&W singer, of course!  Willie's opening line on his first day was, "This is your ol' cotton pickin', snuff dippin', tobacco chewin', coffee pot dodgin', dumplin' eatin', frog giggin' hillbilly from Hill Country!"  He also hosted a children's show,) Lee Woodward (brother of actor Morgan Woodward,) James Clemmons, Micky Murphy, Andres Mantecon.  First DFW station to implement ethnic programming.  Station relocated from 720 kc.
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890

WPJM700, DeSoto.  Low-power station broadcasting city of DeSoto information.


910
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KATH, Frisco.  Call letters established 1/23/2007, although Catholic programming began under KXEB calls on 10/2/2006.  Owner:  Chatham Hill Foundation/Guadalupe Radio Network.  Network affiliation:  EWTN.  Programs:  "Life on the Rock," "Next Way of Life" (both provided by EWTN.)  Sister station of KJON-850. Notables:  Dave Palmer, Claire Romano, Drew Johnson.

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KXEB, Frisco.  Call letters established 3/16/1990.  Format:  Catholic (10/2/2006-present; simulcasted to KFJZ-870 in Spanish,) Liberal Talk ("Air America") (3/21/2005-10/1/2006,) Spanish ("Radio Fiesta Mexicana," "Solo Exitos,") (?-3/20/2005,) Brokered Voice of Asia (11/1999-?,) Spanish (9/6/1999-11/1999,) Soft Oldies (via ABC's "Unforgettable" format (8/11/1998-9/6/1999) and ABC's "Stardust" format (1/1998- 8/11/1998,) Black Gospel ("Joy,") (2/23/1997-1/1998.) Owners:  Spanish Broadcasting System, Rodriguez, Pesa Broadcasting, El Dorado.  Nickname:  "Radio Fiesta Mexicana," "Joy 910," "Fab 105." Was sister station to KTCY-FM (simulcasted their All-Beatles format in 1995.)  Began simulcasting to 1150 AM on 8/1/2001.  Notables:  John LaBella (via ABC's "Stardust" format,) Kevan "Smokin' B" Browning, Willie Mae McIver, Luis de la Garza. As Air America:  Marc Maron, Mark Riley, Al Franken, Katherine Lanpher, Chuck D., Rachel Maddow, Janeane Garofalo, Sam Seder, Mike Malloy, Laura Flanders, Kyle Jason, Ed Schultz (all via satellite.)  Station moved city of license from Sherman to Frisco in 2003.
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KBLN, Sherman.  Call letters established 11/10/1988.  Format:  Spanish, Standards.  Owner:  Belen Enterprises.
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KIKM, Sherman.  Call letters established 7/1975.  Format:  Hot AC/Top 40 (to 1986,) Country (1986-?,) Standards (?-11/1988.)  Nickname:  "Kick-m Country."  Owners:  Sher-Den Communications (1975-?,) Hawthorne Broadcasting (6/1985-?,) Jerry Snyder and Associates.  Network affiliation:  TSN.  Notables:  Steve Eberhart (to 9/1978; left for KVIL,) Ken Barnett aka John Paul Stevens, Melissa Murphy, Richard Kelley, Bob McKinzie, Gil Nelson, John Samford, Gary Mayer, Terry King, Larry Richardson, Bill Samford, Barry Cope (1979-81; now "Elvis Duran" on WHTZ-New York,) Don Sitton aka Don Miller, Larry Carolla (1976,) Barry Diamond, Debbie Hillman.  Sister station to KIKM-FM; initially, nights were simulcasted to FM, then FM became a full simulcast of AM.  Thereafter, each station operated independently, with the FM on automation (beginning in 1977.)  Former employee Steve Eberhart explains:  "The AM jock had to babysit the FM automation system down the hall.  It was our duty to change the tapes before they ran out to ensure the thing stayed on the air.  We, being the live jocks on the Top 40 AM, couldn't have cared less, and many a time, the tapes ran out...One time, the tapes all ran out, which ended up cueing the last event of the day, a PSA cart which it played, cued up, and played again...and again...and again.  A lady called in and said, 'I think you need to go check on your disc jockey; he keeps reading the same thing over and over!'"  Later, a security camera was set up so the AM jocks could see the reels getting empty.  Broadcasted with 1,000 watts.  KIKM was regularly used as a "farm team" for KVIL-FM; over the years, KVIL stole Barnett, King and Eberhart from the station.  Station broadcasted 6AM-12AM.  The KIKM calls were still active until 5/26/1999 as KIKM-FM (at 101.7.)  See entries at 96.7 and 101.7 FM for more details.
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KRRV, Sherman-Richardson.  Station established 10/15/1936 at 1310 kc (at 100 watts, then 250 watts, daytime only,) moved to 880 kc on 6/18/1940 (at 1,000 watts, 24 hours a day) and moved to 910 kc by 1949.  Call letters stood for "Red River Valley."  Format:  Country (days) and Top 40 (nights) (1950s,) Top 40 (1960s-10/1974, Country (10/1974-7/1975.)  Owners:  Grayson Radio (5/1972-?,) Hicks Family, W. Glenn Duncan and Terry McGovern dba McDunn, Inc (9/1965-?,) George H. Wilcox and T. B. Lanford dba Red River Valley Broadcasting (1936-?.)  Network affiliation:  MBS, TSN (and initially received news via wireless radio in Morse code from Trans-Radio Press [1930s.])  One of the largest 1000W antenna patterns in the US.  KRRV's tower was the first built between Dallas and Oklahoma City.  Held dual-city license and operated studios in both cities beginning 12/1/1964.  Programs:  "Don and Ted," "Mary at Madden's," "Sherman High School On the Air," "Farm Report," "Tropical Gardens Ballroom" (KRRV fed their remote broadcast of "Tropical" to 300 MBS stations on Saturday nights; performers such as Tommy Dorsey participated.  The once-familiar introduction to the show was, "Good evening, ladies and gentlemen all across America.  We are greeting you from the beautiful and far-famed Tropical Gardens in Denison, where Texas dances under the stars.")  Station bands:  "Bud Traweek's String Strikers," "Knight's Happy Cowboys," "Night Hawks," "D. G. Boys," "Happy Go-Lucky Cowboys," "Haskell Rannals and his Dixie Rhythm Boys," "Red River Ramblers."  Notables:  Jack Maquire, Bill Jaco and Tom E. Spellman (both defected to KTAN-1500 in 1947, and they later co-owned it,) Dorothy Cox (1937-59,) Lofton L. Hendrick (SM, 1936-56,) Ken Jones (reporter and salesman, 1962; currently owns KHYI-FM,) Evelyn Powers (singer,) William Campbell, Bonnie Beardsley, Rosemary Foundray (singer,) Maurice Wray (and his wife,) V. A. Coker, Edd Routt, Harold Hastings, Glenn Duncan, Brice Dickson, John L. Blaine, Roy Pickett, Grant Turner (1941; later voice of the Grand Old Opry,) Barry Cope (now known as "Elvis Duran" on WHTZ-New York,) M. H. and Eual Short (pre-teen singers, 1938,) Leo Reynolds, Buddy Harris, Eloise Jouvenat, Tom John, W. W. Shelley, Boyd Kelly, Doyle Thompson, Jim Thomas, Earl Ellington, Ray Hohl, Terry James, Tommy Loy (jock; later famous trumpet player,) W. Harrison (as host of "Farm Report.")  Sister station to KDSG-FM (later KIKM-FM.)  Located at 1910 S. Crockett St (1936-2/3/1941, when the building burned down,) then temporarily to the Chamber of Commerce office at 421 N. Crockett St, then to Texoma Parkway (old US 75, just north of US 82) on 5/2/1941 (this building was recently razed; it was used through 2002 for later occupants of the 910 frequency.)  Richardson studios were located at 318 E. Main Street.
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940

KTON, Lancaster.  CP issued 6/8/2007 (station currently in Belton, TX) and no further action has been taken since late 2007.  Owner:  JLF Communications.  Was to have been new local home for BizRadio Network, who decided to go with KJSA-1110AM instead.


950
(frequency dissolved on 3/21/2005)

KKLF, Denison-Sherman.  Call letters re-established c. 2004, off air on 3/21/2005.  Format:  Sports Talk (simulcast of KTCK-1310.)  Frequency was dissolved and call letters relocated to 1700 kc as part of the FCC's dial expansion program of 1989.

KYNG, Denison-Sherman.  Call letters established 3/19/2002.  Format:  Ethnic (as "Radio Desi" via LMA,) Sports (simulcast of KTCK-1310.)  Owner:  Susquehanna.  Call letters resurrected from KYNG-105.3.

KKLF, Denison-Sherman.  Call letters established 6/22/1998.  Format:  Talk (simulcast of KLIF-570.)  Owner:  Susquehanna (bought 4/30/1998.)

KDSX, Denison-Sherman.  Station established 9/26/1948 at 1220 kc; moved to 950 in 1953.  Owner:  B. V. Hammond (with co-owner Lofton Hendrick,) Sock Hop Radio, Susquehanna (bought 3/13/1998 along with 1700 kc.)  Nickname:  "The Voice of Texomaland," "Sock Hop Radio."  Network affiliation:  LBS.  Program:  "Daddy-O Drag."  Notables:  Charles Davis, Jim Thomas, Rex Russell, John Hale, Don Day. Sister station to KDSX-101.7 FM (later known as KDSQ, KDVE and KIKM.)  950 was apparently sold in favor of purchasing 910 (see above.)


970
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KHVN, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 6/3/1985.  Format:  Black Gospel.  Nickname:  "Heaven 97."  Owner:  Mortenson Broadcasting (5/31/2002-present,) Infinity/CBS (3/1996-5/31/2002,) Granum (3/1991-3/1996,) Gillmore (1988-1991.)   Originally sister station to KDLZ-FM (1985-12/23/1988) and later KJMZ-FM/KRBV-FM (12/23/1988-12/2001) and KGGR (12/2001-present.)  Program:  "Community Forum."  Notables:  Dave Martin (GM,) Alisa Robinson, Joe Bagby, Robert Ashley (ND and host of "Community Forum,") Drew Dawson, Katrina Bryant, Cedric Bailey, Warren Brooks, Keith Solis, Tanya English, Barbara Mallory-Calloway (former Dallas City Councilwoman,) Dexter Andrews, Lawanna Johnson, Sister Minnie Francis, Rev. David Green, James Mitchell, Michael Ray, Dion Mortenson (GM.)  Was scheduled to go dark on 12/31/2007 as part of the FCC's dial expansion program of 1989, in exchange for a frequency with a full day/night schedule on KKGM-1630.
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KSAX, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 3/15/1982.  Format:  Jazz.  Call letters stood for saxophone.  Sister station to KNOK-FM.  Owner:  Earl G. Graves dba EGG-Dallas aka Black Enterprises.  Notables:  Alisa Robinson, "Wee" Willie Culton, Bob Stewart, Kevin Singer, Robert Ashley.
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KNOK, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 1953.  Format:  Variety/Ethnic (1953-1954,) R&B with Country and Spanish on weekends (1954-1957,) R&B (exclusively; first in area to do so) (1957-1968 and simulcasted fulltime to KNOK-FM; simulcasted 50% from 1968 to 2/5/1979,) Jazz (2/5/1979-3/15/1982; separately programmed from AM.)  Owner:  Jack Flood dba Associated Broadcasters (1953-1956,) John Kluge (1956-1960; Kluge later founded Metromedia,) Townsend Investment Company aka Townsend Fund Stations (1960-1963,) Chatham Corporation (1963-1978,) Earl G. Graves dba EGG-Dallas aka Black Enterprises (1978-1988,) Sheridan Broadcasting. Sister station to KNOK-FM.  Primarily a black station in the 1950s and 1960s, FW's Delbert McClinton was the very first white artist played on the station with his song, "Wake Up Baby," in the early 1960s.  Programs:  "Turner's Turntable," "Blues at Sunrise," "Doodle for Dollars," "Homeshow," "Gospel Train," "Negro Spiritual Hour," "Gospel Music Train," "Shootin' the Breeze," "Top O' the Day," "Big D Express," "Jubilee Serenade," "Blues at Sunset," "DJ's Showcase."  Notables: Stu Hepburn (GM, 2/1957-1960; President/part-owner with singer Pat Boone, 1960-1963; President/25% owner, 1963-1978,) Dean McClain (host of "Blues at Sunrise,") Bill Hix, Dell Cook, Neil Baird, Jerry Park, "Mr. Lucky," Lenita Johnson, Jimmy Clemons, Charles Brewer, Tony Price, Bob Stewart (morning show host who also had a jazz trio, "Bob Stewart and Company,") Roy Johnson, Julia Scott, Frank Clarke, Jerry Thomas (began 1954,) Curtis Pierce, Jerry Spencer, Freddie Jenkins, Ruben T. "Mad Lad" Washington, Larry Carolla (1976,) "Big" Jim Randolph, Bob Stewart, "Wee" Willie Culton.  Daytime only station (but from 1957-1979, KNOK-FM simulcasted KNOK-AM; when the AM signed off at sunset, the FM simply continued on seamlessly thereafter.)  Station was located at 3601 Kimbo in Fort Worth, but maintained an office and studio concurrently in Dallas.
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KWBC, Fort Worth.  Station established 12/4/1946.  Format:  Variety/Ethnic with black-oriented, amateur and public service programming.  Owners:  Associated Broadcasters, Worth Broadcasting Company (run by P. W. Seward, Joe Davies and Ben Smith; bought transmitter building and tower site for $6,545 and studios for $35,000; total cost to go on-air at $70,000.)  Slogan:  "Serving Over a Million Texans."  Network affiliation:  AP.  Broadcasted with 1000 watts.  Programs:  "Listen Ladies," "Blues at Sunrise," "McNeil at the Wheel."  Notables:  Moses Cardona, Alton Cocke, Ed Hogan (1940s; announcer and later PD; later was host of WFAA-TV's daily "Dialing for Dollars" movie,) Dean McClain (began R&B music in 1950 on one-hour program, "McNeil at the Wheel" and later "Blues at Sunrise,") Mary K. Middleton, Margaret Bruyere aka Margaret Brown, Robert Chapman, Roy Loba, P. W. Seward, Joe S. Davies, Ben G. Smith, William Love aka Lewis Love, Ralph "Buddy" Widman (PD, 1946-1948;) Eva Robb Watkins (as host of "Listen Ladies,") Everet Baty, Melvin Parsons, Jim Lowe, Mildred Cunningham, Jerry Janes, Marjorie McCarley, Clarence Anglin, E. H. Walker, J. B. McCrory, J. F. Haacker, Whitson Jones, James E. Rennie, Rev. J. Frank Norris (who simulcasted his Sunday morning services from KFJZ in the 1940s; it was the area's first attempt at simulcasting.)  First DFW station to broadcast a Spanish language program.  By 1953, most commercial billings were from ethnic shows, so owner Associated changed the calls to KNOK and reimaged the station to serve a black audience.  Daytime only station.  Studios located at Joseph Building, 9th and Main in Fort Worth; transmitter on Old Denton Road, east of Sylvania Avenue.
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990

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KFCD, Farmersville.  Call letters established 12/14/2004.  Format:  Spanish Religious, Urban (via Rejoice Soul Food syndicated format, 2008,) Talk (live, then to Talk America on 11/1/2005,) Fox Sports (to 10/31/2005; KHFX took Fox Sports away on 11/1/2005.)  Owner:  Dave Schum dba The Watch, Inc. dba DFW Radio License LLP (to 10/13/2005,) D. B. Swirn (10/13/2005-2007,) Principal Broadcasting (2007-present.)  Currently under LMA to Bernard Radio-Dallas.  Nicknames:  "SportsFan 990" (1/2007-present, under lease arrangement to Thom Bailey,) "Texas Talk Radio."  Flagship station of the FC-Dallas soccer club (formerly the Dallas Burn.)  To have been sister station to forthcoming KHSE-700 (formerly KCAF.)  Basically a re-imaging of KMSR.  Notables: Kevin McCarthy (to 5/2/2005,) Mike Fisher (sports talk host; was last live show on station after all other employees quit or got fired,) Jerry Overton, Kate Delaney, Doc Bryce, Dave Marcum, Allan Stanglin, Teena Jones, Chevis King, Joe Howard, Michael Reagan (via satellite,) Randy Fuller, Martha Martinez, Bob "Mike" Elmore, Connie Enriquez Herrera.  Station went bankrupt in 8/2005 and was auctioned off 10/13/2005 to D. B. Swirn, who was Schum's largest creditor, for $9 million (included KHSE;) KFCD/KMSR was a second chance for owner Schum, who had previously taken 990 to bankruptcy under KCAF calls on 4/12/2003.

KMSR, Farmersville.  Call letters established 3/3/2004.  Format:  Talk.  Owner:  Dave Schum dba The Watch, Inc.  Nickname:  "Main Street Radio."  To have been sister station to forthcoming KHSE-700, Wylie (formerly KXXL and KCAF; KCAF calls were "parked" at 700 when 990 relinquished them.)  Notables:  Kevin McCarthy (longtime DJ at KNUS and later talk show host at KLIF; concurrently hosts an auto advice show on WBAP,) Don Imus (via satellite,) David Gold, Michael Reagan (via satellite,) Randy Fuller (traffic,) Jerry Overton (VP/GM,) Dave Marcum (late of KFWR-FM,) Mike Fisher, Andrea Pilcher, M. I. Blackwell, Connie Enriquez Herrera (lone holdover from Cafe 990,) Gennifer North (traffic,) Dave Little, Chuck Cason, David Burrall.  Studios located at 12900 Preston Road (in the former KTXQ [Radio One version] and KLTY studios.)
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE

KCAF, Farmersville.  Call letters established 6/27/2002; satellite programming began 6/28/2002, and live programming began 10/21/2002.  Format:  Women's Talk ("Cafe 990," 10/21/2002-10/23/2002,) Conservative Talk via Radio America (6/28/2002-10/21/2002; 10/23/2002-3/3/2004.)  Owner:  Dave Schum dba Renaissance Radio aka The Watch, Inc.  Nickname:  "Cafe 990."  To have been sister station to forthcoming KXXL-700, Wylie.   Notables:  Gail Lightfoot, Katie Pruitt (PD and talk show host,) Laurie Seale ("The Six-Foot Blonde,") Lynne Haze (paid a reported $60K a year to come over from KRNB-FM,) Lora Cain, Dr. Joy Browne (via satellite,) Scott Savage, Steven "Stubie" Doak, Ira Lipson (created format,) Jim Verde, Barbara Marullo (former KZEW jock in 1975-1976,) Kelly Vrla, Connie Herrera, Mike Shannon (II.)  "Cafe 990" has the unenviable distinction of having the shortest run of any regular format in DFW radio history, signing off the format after just three days (see story below.)  60 billboards touting the station's premiere were rented across town; all contained a humorous poke at men...such as, "The Seat is Always Down," "Broad Topics," etc.  Pre-"Cafe" stunting consisted of cafe "sounds"...indistinct conversations, dishes clanging, etc.  After Cafe 990 signed off, Radio America programming resumed.  KCAF was the third station to migrate from Wichita Falls (KGKO-570 and KAAM-620 were the others.)  Station located at 9400 N. Central (in the former KVIL penthouse studios.)  As a Wichita Falls station, KCAF was previously known as KXXL (2/1/2000-6/27/2002, although station was already dark when Schum purchased it; former KXXL owner Dick Moran sued Schum to get the license back,) KTUB (9/4/1998-2/1/2000,) KWFT (9/25/1995-9/4/1998; taking the former longtime, historic calls from 620AM, which went dark in 1994 and became KAAM in 10/1995,) KNIN (10/7/1991-9/25/1995,) KKCR (10/19/1990-10/7/1991,) and KGTM (11/9/1983-10/19/1990.)
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE

SIDEBAR:  WHY DID A RADIO STATION SIGN OFF AFTER JUST THREE DAYS ON THE AIR???
Many rumors and much conjecture surrounded KCAF after its quick fall.  Articles in the Dallas Morning News and the Dallas Observer  painted owner Schum as the bad guy, going into the transaction undercapitalized and with little business experience.  Dave Schum agreed to an interview for this website in 2004, and the following timeline is based on documentation and his personal recollection of those events.  This is not meant to explain all sides of the story; others who spoke to me on the subject had varying observations, and further input or challenges to the following information by those involved would be welcome and will be posted.  I also encourage you to click the Observer link above for another take on the story.  I claim NO responsibility for the accuracy and/or truthfulness contained in the following summary:

After receiving a license for 990 in 1997, station owner and Dallas restauranteur Dave Schum hired Scott Savage in 2002 to put together a format and hire talent to be used on Schum's dormant frequency.  The process became a rush job right off the bat.  The pricey, former KVIL penthouse studios were rented, which were left stripped and bare (and early hires brought furniture from home to work from.)  Ira Lipson, longtime programming consultant who had come up with the "Zoo" idea for KZEW years earlier, was brought in to develop the format.  Savage did all the hiring and arranged for all the working capital, but finances ran short very quickly.  Savage used his personal credit card to pay for some needed studio equipment (Schum estimates about $5,000 worth.)  Some of the operations employees became aware of the cash shortage, but pushed ahead to get the station on the air anyway, reportedly at Savage's insistence.  According to Schum, most of the on-air talent was signed to long-term contracts (six years, in some cases.)  Already, there were reservations from the staff about the station not being ready in time, and the power output being poor (a much-needed power upgrade CP was left in limbo due to financial shortages.)  Putting off the start date was considered, but the billboard company put heat on the station to run all 60 advertisements according to the original date planned.  On the premiere date, 10/21/2002, Schum realized that he wouldn't be able to make the first payroll.  First, Schum approached Savage about a loan to cover payroll; Savage agreed, but then reneged.  Schum then checked into bridge financing (a short-term loan to cover immediate needs,) but was turned down for a $1.5 million request.  He then offered to sell the station to Savage.  Savage, who Schum says had already formed a consortium on the side and was actively seeking a local station to buy anyway, contacted his own business partner, Ed Ferreri (dba Pinnacle Broadcasting,) who offered Schum a pitiful $1 up front, and a lump payment of $250,000 later for the entire operation.  (A reasonable price for a working, rimshot AM station at the time would have been $6-$10 million.)  Schum balked at the lowball offer.  On the second day of operations, October 22, some employees received paychecks that did indeed cash, but HR was told to not pass out any more.  An employee meeting held that evening allowed Schum to explain what was going on, and all of the employees decided to go forth and keep the station on the air anyway...provided Schum accepted Savage's buyout offer.  Savage indicated that he had the cash to cover payroll, but wouldn't cover it if Schum didn't sell him the station.  At 3PM the following day, October 23, the employees were gathered again for Schum to announce that payroll would still not be met, and at 7PM, Schum told the group that he had refused Savage's offer.  Everyone then packed their bags and walked out, after a mere three days on the air.

Schum's ongoing contention is that Savage always had his sights set on wrestling the station away from him, and that Savage rushed the premiere process along and made the station doomed to fail.  Schum identified one employee, who was a friend and former co-worker of Savage's, who engaged in theatrics during the meetings to galvanize the rest of the employees against Schum.  He also blames CFO Carla Phillips for hastily cutting the check for the billboards instead of making payroll.  Regardless, Schum sought bankruptcy to protect his assets, and was filed on by Savage, Ira Lipson and TM Century (local jingle service,) along with many of the employees who were not paid and/or had contracts.  By early 2004, Schum said that he was through most of the process of paying off those debts, and that 990 would again take to the airwaves that April.  While Schum's second attempt at running a station lasted longer, it was met with much of the same financial woes, and ended up being sold to a creditor at auction in October, 2005.


1040
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KGGR, Dallas.  Call letters established 7/1990.  Format:  Black Religious.  Owner:  Mortenson Broadcasting.  Nickname:  "Great Gospel Radio."  Notables:  Lador Frank, Ann Arnold, Alvin McCottry aka "Brother Al," Calvin Foster, Jerome Thomas, Tonya Hall.  Daytime only station.
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KPBC, Dallas.  Call letters established 10/26/1973 (but programming began 10/20/1973.)  Format:  Religious.  Owner:  Don Crawford Sr dba Crawford Broadcasting.  Call letters stood for Percy B. Crawford , original owner of Crawford Broadcasting.  KPBC moved to 770 AM in 3/1990 to increase signal (see entry there.)  Nickname:  "The Warm Sound," "Stereo Love 1040."  Programs:  "The Overcomers Club," "Dr. Moon Show."  Notables:  Chuck Mohnkern, Jeff Dale, Bill MacCormick aka Bill Dennis (1976-present; PD; continued into KPBC-770AM and KAAM-770AM,) Tony Lawrence, Chris Goodwin, Andy Connell aka Crash Kelly, Doreen Day, Jeff Dale, Robert Moon (as host of "The Dr. Moon Show,") "Deacon" Don Evans (hosted a call-in 'help' show for listeners, entitled "The Overcomers Club," solving problems with a song.)  Logo above was an answer to KVIL-FM's annual bumper sticker distribution ("I Love KVIL," "KVIL Loves Me," etc.)  Daytime only station.
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KIXL, Dallas.  Station established 6/8/1947.  Format:  Easy Listening/M-O-R/"Beautiful Music."  Owners:  Lee Segall (created the national radio program, "Dr. I. Q.,") dba Variety Broadcasting, with celebrity minority owners Tyrone Power, Dallasite Greer Garson and William Holden and local partner Julius Schepps; Robert and Theodore Strauss dba Strauss Broadcasting (2/15/1964-?; Theodore was a sales man at KIXL from 1947-1964.)  Nickname:  "The New Radio Concept." Daytime simulcasting to sister station KIXL-FM (nickname was "104 on Both Dials.")  Network affiliation:  American Information Network.  Feature:  "Think It Over" (short famous quotations and 'thoughts-for-the-day;' later assembled into two books and sold to interested listeners.)  Programs:  "Radio Town Mirror" ('Radio Town' was the nickname of KIXL's building,) SMU Theatre of the Air," "Radio Phone Club," "From Bed to Worse," "Prisoner of War," "Homemaker Show," "Music Review," "March of Music," "What's New," "Viewpoint," "Midday Masterpieces," "Deems Taylor Classics."  Notables: Bob Johnston (1960-1961,) Hugh Lampman (1952-1954,) Murray Followill (father of Dallas Mavericks radio announcer Mark Followill,) Meg Healy (host of "Meg Healy's Homemaker Show,") Ricky Cox, Ken Foote, Frank Filesi, Jerry Haynes (later "Mr. Peppermint" on WFAA-TV,) Pierce Allman, Dick Hitt (later Dallas Times Herald columnist,) Charlie Payne, Jack Darden, Rev. Jimmy McClain (voice of "Think It Over" and played the role of "Dr. I. Q.;" became a NW Texas minister in the late 1940s after leaving WFAA-AM,) Harold "Hal" Smith, Dan Hayslett, Bob Tripp, Marvin Hillis, Paul Gleiser (1971-1972,) Phil Davis, Bill Shaw (1952-53,) Don Robinson, David Healy (son of Meg,) Bill Bailey, Jonathan Hayes aka Jeff Edward (10/1970-6/1973; longtime personality and traffic reporter; currently with KLUV's morning show,) Dave Beuret (to 1971,) Rob Edwards, John Wilson, Les Sims, David Bradshaw, Bill Morgan, Jim Mitchell, Olin Terry, Joe Hickman, Shirley Stone, Clate Holm, Ben Laurie, Neal Browne, Joe Van Riper.  Applied for TV station on Channel 2 in 1948.  Located at "Radio Town," 1401 S. Akard St, south of downtown Dallas; transmitter located at Military Pkwy and Forney Road.  Daytime only station.
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE
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1052
(285 METERS)

KGDO, Dallas.  Station licensed on 5/9/1927, but apparently never signed on air.  Owner:  Henry "Dad" Garrett (who had started up WRR in 1922.)


1080
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KRLD, Dallas.  Station established 10/31/1926 (other sources say 2/14/1926 and 10/30/1926.)  Format:  Variety, News/Sports/Talk (1/7/2002-present,) Easy Listening (KRLD claims to have switched to news and information in April, 1978, but personal recollection has them programming music and news way into 1979.)  Owner:  Infinity/CBS.  Former owners: Radio Laboratories of Dallas (originally "Dallas Radio Laboratories," but the KDRL calls were already taken!), Edwin J. Kiest (acquired shortly after sign-on; the "K" in "KRLD" was said to stand for "Kiest,") Times Herald Printing, Metropolitan Broadcasting, Times Mirror (to 1970; sold per FCC rules after acquiring KRLD-TV,) Philip Jonsson dba Great Plains Exploration (1970-1978,) Metromedia (1/1978-?; divested of KAFM due to FCC rules,) SFX, Westinghouse (which was acquired by CBS in 1996.)  Calls were also said to stand for "Keep Radio Leading Dallas."  Nicknames:  "Your News and Information Center," "Cross-Over Country Music," "All Pro Radio" (1977,) "All Star Listening Around the Clock," "Newsradio 1080," "Galaxy 4, Transponder 3, Channel 61.7" (KRLD's satellite information.)  Former sister station to KRLD-FM [92.5]/KAFM-FM, KRLD-Channel 4 and The Dallas Times Herald; later to KRLD-Channel 33 (1984) and KRLD-FM at 105.3.  Network:  CBS (1929-present; briefly with ABC when WFAA took the CBS affiliation for their All-News format on 8/1/1975, but was one of the original 16-member station group to join CBS in 1929.)  Formerly on 890 kc (twice,) 840 kc, 650 kHz (1927-1934) and 1040 kHz (1934-1941; shared time with KTHS-Hot Springs AR; KTHS had shared time with WBAP in the 1920s.)  Upgraded signal to present 50kW in 1938.  Broadcasts in stereo.  First station to present live broadcasts of high school and college football games; first to broadcast live music and entertainment programs, and first to offer continuous election results.  1920s KRLD salesman Clyde Rembert conceived the idea of advertising spots, thus inventing the concept of commercials (gee, thanks!)  Flagship station for the Texas Rangers baseball team (1972-1973; 1995-present,) Dallas Chaparrals basketball, and the Dallas Cowboys (1960s-1977; 198?-1990,) and carried Houston Astros baseball in the 1960s.  Only union radio station in DFW.

Programs:  "Sports Central," "Hometown Editor," "The Auto Show," "CBS Radio Mystery Theater," "Ask the Lawyer," "Hillbilly Hit Parade," "Swap and Shop," "Garden Gate" (hosted by Dewey Compton,) "Clockwatch Show," "Big D Jamboree" (began 10/16/1948 on KRLD; previously on WFAA,) "Longhorn Jamboree," "All Night Trucking Show," "Radio Revival," "Music Revival," "Texas Roundup," "KRLD Salutes...," "Johnny Hicks' Popular Discs," "Music Till Dawn," "Alex Burton Commentary," "Music Thru the Night," "Cornbread Matinee," "Montage," "Eye on the Internet," "Cerie Segal's Travel Tips," "Ask Tex Schramm," "KRLD Radio Theater," "The Marty Griffin Show," "Mike Hargrove Show" (Texas Rangers player,) "Danny O'Brien Show" (Rangers' GM,) "Information Highway," "Potpourri," "Vignettes of Texas History" (1983-91,) "The KRLD Restaurant Show with Jim White," "Thought for the Day" (short, thought-provoking messages ala KIXL's "Think It Over,") "High School Football Scoreboard."  Station band:  The Stamps Quartet.

Notables:  Frank Glieber (1959-1966; 1968-1985; Sports Director beginning in 1970; host of "Ask Tex Schramm" [Schramm was GM for the Dallas Cowboys,]) Brad Barton (4/3/1978-8/6/2009,) Eddie Barker, Ves Box (1940-1952,) Carl Braz, John Butler,  Ray LaPere, Joe Holstead, Dick Wheeler (ND; retired 4/1989,) Alex Burton (1970-1990; newscaster and host of "Alex Burton Commentary,") Sandy Banks, Laurel Ornish (began 1985; became Business Editor when Ward Andrews retired; returned late 1990s as substitute anchor,) Bob Hathaway, Jody Dean, Paul Chambers (6/1985-2/1995; now with CNN's "Entertainment Extra,") Tony deHaro aka Tony Welch (news director of Metromedia, and cousin to KDMX's Anna deHaro,) Jack Heinritz aka Jack Hines, Joe Fuchs aka Jay Weaver (as host of "The Auto Show,") Charley Wright (who appeared as a contestant on the nighttime "The Price is Right" in 1978 while employed at KRLD; the station got a free plug out of the deal!,) Neil Sperry, Randy Coffey (to 6/2002,) James Underwood, "Pappy" Hal Horton (host of "Hillbilly Hit Parade,") "Uncle" Gus Foster (host of "Texas Roundup,") Rex Griffin (later host of "Texas Roundup,") Ted Parrino, Katie Pruitt (anchor, traffic reporter and host of "Eye on the Internet,") Jim Reeves, Art Riley, William A. Roberts, Russ Rossman, Woodrow Shelley, Ed Wodka (VP/GM,) Charles Simmons aka Paul Ross, Steve Simmons, Michael Spears (1994-6/17/2002,) Barbara Schwarz, Tom Tully, Brad Wheelis (now anchor with ABC Radio News,) Mick Williams (regular round-table contributor on "Charley Jones Overnight;" evolved into "Mick Williams Cyber-Line,") Wes Wise (later Dallas mayor,) Doug Helton, Roger Emrich aka "The Raj-mahal," Hugh Lampman (9/1/1954-1963; as host of "Music Till Dawn;" occasionally was broadcasted in one channel on KRLD-AM, and the other channel on KRLD-FM...creating a 'stereo' effect!,) Bob Cockrum (1982-9/3/1993,) Randy Brown aka Christopher Haze, Mark Lambert, Larry Huchingson (engineer; currently with "Entertainment Tonight,") Dan McGraw (who performed a special radio newscast for use in a February, 1962 episode of CBS' "Route 66" filmed on location in Dallas; the KRLD calls were clearly identified.)

Also Lori Cain (1994-2000,) Charley Jones, Jack Davis, Peter Arnel, Glenn Mitchell (1992-1994,) Dick Osborne, Tony Lawrence, Nancy Jay, Jo Interrante, David Hultsman, Chris Marrou (longtime news anchor at KENS-TV in San Antonio,) Murphy Martin, Kevin McCarthy, Ed McLemore, Bill Mercer (began 1953,) Dietra Miles (now with ABC Radio News,) Craig Miller, Laura Miller (later newspaper columnist and mayor of Dallas,) Sam Donaldson (currently an ABC newsman,) Al Wisk (currently a Dallas attorney, and formerly the LA Rams announcer; quit KRLD to attend law school,) Lynn Woolley, Mark Watkins (2002-8/6/2009,) Jocelyn White, Ruth Clem, Phil Adler (left 12/1993,) Ward Andrews (former WBAP/KXAS-TV anchor; Business Editor to 1985,) Bill Bailey, Ralph Baker,  Rick Roberts, Craig Way (hosted "High School Football Scoreboard,") Jim Underwood, Bob Huffaker, Cameron Fairchild (fired in 10/1994 after a fight with Jody Dean!), Rick Ulrick aka Rick Erickson, Bob Morrison (ND,) Joyce King, Ken Fairchild, Suzanne Calvin (1978-1981, 1991-1994,) Howard Chamberlain, Steve Coryell, Ken Dowe (host of "Information Highway,") Rick Wais, Ray Walker (1979,) Rob Milford (5/1999 to 4/2002,) Charlynne Burgess (singer with the KRLD Radio Orchestra in the 1940s,) Jon Dillon (as host of acid music "Montage" program,) Jeff Dale, Marty Miller (1979,) Clyde White aka Jim White (I) (1995-present; news anchor and host of "The KRLD Restaurant Show with Jim White,") Jesse Milburn, James Crocker, Donna Drew, Melvin Munn, Mike Rogers, Charlie Butts (1988-10/1993,) Johnny Hicks (as host of "Johnny Hicks' Popular Discs,") Sonny Carpenter, Charlie Seraphin, Jack Schell, Dave Cooke, Terry Bell, Eric Merenge, Clarissa Douglas (currently with ABC Radio News,) Mike "Bob" Elmore, Ken Fairchild, Dan Foster, Irene Runnels, Alice Rios, Baylor Witcher (2000, late of KYNG-FM,) John Harper, Jim Foster, Murray Jackson, Tony Garrett, Gary DeLaune, Roy Nichols (Gary and Roy defected from KLIF's newsroom to KRLD-AM/TV on the same day; Roy became a news anchor on KRLD-TV,) Walter Evans (1955-1964; later news anchor for KRLD-TV,) Art Hains, Allan Jackson, Dallas Townsend, Art Hammett (1960-77; longtime traffic reporter and Dallas policeman who was murdered by a jealous husband!), Bob McCormick (began 9/9/1991,) Ron Rice (I), Chem Terry (as host of the "Clockwatch Show" and morning show, mid-1950s to early-1970s,) Jim Farr, Dewey Compton, Jerry Overton, Chuck Wheeler, Barbara Jean "B. J." Austin, Peter Gardner, Ron De Roxtra aka Ron Bahr (1984-1994,) Ron Barr (syndicated sports show host; no connection to Ron Bahr/De Roxtra.)

Also Jay Walker (engineer,) Bob Dahlgren, Tony Purcell, Gary Brandt, Randy Galloway, Dan Rather (current CBS news anchor,) Bill Cerverha, Russell Scott, Marvin Kalb, Jerome Davis, Harvey Martin (former Dallas Cowboys player who hosted "The Beautiful Harvey Martin Show" in the late 1970s,) Harold Goodman, Heather Behrens, Jennifer Ellis, Brian Burns, Ray Whitworth aka Ray Kennedy, Kym West, Chuck Schechner (defected to KRLD from a long stint at KLIF-570 in 2002,) Ty Walker, Iris Bekker, Brad Sham, Keith Carter, Tom Tradup (began 7/1989,) Tom Bigby, Jeff Hayes, Wayne Harrison, Robert Z. "Bob" Glass (owner of start-up station KFOP; hired away in 1925 to build KRLD when his station went under; continued as one of a two-person staff in the 1920s!), Lee Dunkelberg, John LaVine aka John Wolf, Larry Scott (as host of the "All Night Trucking Show,") Dr. Laura Schlessinger (via satellite, 1994-1/4/2002.)  Station located at the Kirby Building (1930s,) The Adolphus Hotel (2nd floor, 1940s,) with the Dallas Times Herald at 1101 Patterson (1940s-1964,) with KRLD/KDFW-Channel 4 at 400 N. Griffin (1964-1971,) the former Maxwell Electronic Corporation building at 7901 Carpenter Fwy from 1971-1995 (housed Maxwell's KMEC-TV Channel 33 from 1968-1969, and Evans Broadcasting from 1969-70;)  the Ballpark in Arlington (1995-2005,) and at 4131 N. Central Expwy (2005-present.) While located at the Adolphus Hotel downtown, KRLD exchanged rent for radio plugs:  "KRLD, voice of the Great Southwest in Dallas-Fort Worth, located in the Adolphus Hotel" was their usual ID.   Initial broadcast schedule (1920s) was six hours a day (and off the air Wednesdays for maintenance!)  During Metromedia's ownership, the Maxwell building's address was changed from 7901 Carpenter Freeway to 1080 Metromedia Place.  Although Metromedia is long gone from DFW, the street name still remains today!

Andrew Dart has unearthed some long-lost photos from KRLD-AM!  Check them out here.

AIRCHECK AVAILABLE

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1110

KJSA, Mineral Wells.  Station re-established 4/27/2008 (moved from 1120AM.)  Format:  Business Talk (from BizRadio Network; Houston-based BizRadio is also on the 1110 AM frequency in Alvin/Houston,)  Country (as "Big Country," 2/2009-date.)  Simulcast of former BizRadio frequency KMNY-1360 AM, 4/27/2008-5/2/2008; completed transition to 1110 AM on 5/3/2008.  Owner:  M&M Broadcasters (to 4/2008; then 2/2009-date.) BizRadio Partners (4/2008-2/2009; note was for $7.5 million; BizRadio owner Dan Frishberg put more than half the money down up front, but let the station go back to M&M after BizRadio suffered major financial trouble later in 2008.)  Call letters stand for "Jerry Snyder and Associates" (former owner.)

1120

KCLE, Cleburne.  Station established 4/1947.  Original dial position for KCLE-1140 (not part of this survey; moved to 1140 kc in 7/2000; CP to move back to 1120 kc as of 2005; swapped calls with KHFX-1460 on 9/1/2008.)  Format:  Country.  Owner:  George Marti and Jim Gordon (to 1969,) George Marti (1969-2005; minority partner in later years,) M&M Broadcasters (partnership of Gary Moss and George Marti; ?-2/2003; bought back station in 12/2005,) First Broadcasting (2/2003-12/2005.)  Former sister station to KCLE-94.3/94.9 (see entry at 94.9 FM for personalities and more information.)

And separately, serving the Mineral Wells/Fort Worth area (frequency dissolved in 2008; station moved to 1110AM):

KJSA, Mineral Wells.  Call letters established 10/31/1983, dark after 5/2008 (moved to 1110AM.)  Format:  Country (12/2003-4/2008,) Nostalgia ("Music of Your Life.")  Nickname: "The Radio Ranch."  Owners:  First Broadcasting, Big D Broadcasting (bought 4/30/2004,) Jerry Snyder and Associates, M&M Broadcasters (bought 12/2005.)  Notable:  Don Swancy (9/1984-12/1984; Swancy also had worked at former frequency holder KORC.)  In the mid-2000s, a CP was on file to move station to Maple Grove, MN (no, that's not a typo!)  Instead, station upgraded power to 20kw by moving to 1110AM (see entry there.)

KYXS, Mineral Wells.  Call letters established 10/13/1981.  Format unknown.  Sister station at 95.9 FM retained the KXYS calls from 10/13/1981 to 10/4/2002.

KORC, Mineral Wells.  Station established at  1140 kc on 12/1/1946.  Format unknown.  Owner:  Achilles Corcanges.  Notable:  Don Swancy (later worked for KJSA.)

And separately, serving the Dallas area:

KFOP, Dallas.  Station established 2/1924, dark by 6/1924.  Unknown format.  Owner:  Wilson Construction Company.  Notable:  Robert Glass (who signed on KRLD in 1926.)  Located at Texas Building.


1150
(frequency dissolved in 2004; station relocated to 1160)
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KBIS, Highland Park.  Call letters established 3/1/2001, dark in 2004.  Format:  Voice of Asia simulcasted from KXEB-910 (8/1/2001-?,) Business Talk Radio Network (3/1/2001-8/1/2001; company leased airtime from Rodriguez.)  Nickname:  "Your Business Edge."  Owner:  Rodriguez, Metroplex Broadcasting, Dallas AM Partners.  Notable:  Don Imus (via satellite, through summer 2001.)  Station relocated to 1160 AM.
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KDMM, Highland Park.  Call letters established 11/21/1994.  Format:  Easy Listening via Westwood One satellite (1994-?,) Business, Ethnic, Nostalgia (10/1997-?,) All Traffic (2/24/1997-10/1997.)  Call letters stood for "Dallas Music Memories."  Owner:  Rodriguez.  Notables:  Len Mohnkern, Bob Cooper, Danny Moffat.  Conflicting sources show an Asian format beginning on 8/30/1997.  Spanish simulcast of Dallas Cowboys football games in 1996.
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KVIL, Highland Park.  Call letters re-established 8/11/1986.  Format:  Soft Rock.  Simulcast of KVIL-FM; station reverted to original calls after the FCC laxed simulcasting rules.  See KVIL-FM for list of personalities and owners.  Daytime only station.
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KVIX, Highland Park.  Call letters established 10/1/1985.  Format:  Soft Rock.  Sister station to KVIL-FM; the FCC discouraged fulltime simulcasting in the mid-1980s, and KVIL's owner requested a call letter change to underscore the separation of the two stations.  See KVIL-FM for list of personalities and owners.  Daytime only station.
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KVIL, Highland Park.  Station established 3/1/1960.  Format:  Soft Rock.  Original owner:  John Coyle dba University Advertising Co. (Coyle rescued KVIL during the construction process when the original owner ran out of money.)  Simulcast of KVIL-FM during certain dayparts (1970s) to full simulcast (late 1970s-1985.)  Original 1960 staff roster:  John J. Coyle, owner; John A. Hicks, VP of operations; Jack R. Howard, VP and GM (former commercial manager of KIXL-AM;) Dillard Carrera, PD (former production manager of KIXL-AM;) Dave Beuret, Hap Arnold, Andy Anderson and Ron Bailey, announcers; Robert Farris, Gordon Vaughn, Ernest Jennings and Robert Warren, engineers; Jay Larsen, commercial manager; Jimmy Wilson and Wyatt Higginbotham, sales; Pat Hatcher, traffic manager (formerly with WFAA-AM;) and Sue Noland, secretary.  "Shootin'" Jim Newton worked with University Advertising during 1959 to put KVIL on the air.  See KVIL-FM for list of later personalities and owners.  Daytime only station.

1160

KVCE, Highland Park.  Call letters established 8/23/2006, but format began 9/12/2006.  Format:  R&B Oldies (8/23/2006-9/12/2006,) Conservative Talk (9/12/2006-3/1/2009,) Conservative Talk/Business Talk (3/2/2009-present; select programming from the BizRadio Network moved from 1110AM and leased weekday time on KVCE.)  Owners:  Dan Patrick and Edd Hendee.  Nickname:  "The Voice."  Mostly a simulcast of Patrick's Houston station, KSEV-700AM.  Notables:  Sean Matthews, Matt McClearin, Jerry Overton, Edd Hendee, Mark Russo, Dan Frishberg.

KMGS, Highland Park.  Call letters established 6/20/2005.  Format:  R&B Oldies (began 4/2005 under KBIS calls.)  Owner:  First Broadcasting.  Nickname:  "Magic 1160."  Exclusively commercial-free Motown R&B through summer, 2005, then to general R&B oldies thereafter.

KBIS, Highland Park.  Call letters established 3/1/2001 at 1150 kc.  Format:  Motown Oldies.  Dark during most of 2004 and early 2005 during frequency switch from 1150.

And, separately, serving Cedar Hill:

KNNV692, Cedar Hill.  Low-power station broadcasting city of Cedar Hill information.

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1190
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KFXR, Dallas.  Call letters established 11/12/2001.  Format:  Sports Talk (Fox Sports Radio; began 4/9/2001 under KTRA calls,) Oldies (4/1/2005-2/21/2006,) Country (2/22/2006-3/30/2008,) CNN News (3/31/2008-date.)  Nickname:  "Mighty 1190" (resurrected from the old KLIF-1190,) "Lone Star 1190" (name began under country format on 4/24/2006, soon changed to "Cowboy 1190,") "CNN 1190."  Owner:  Clear Channel, but broker First Broadcasting managed station under LMA until 12/2007.  Notables:  James Carney aka "Moby" (returned to DFW market after 20-year hiatus, albeit via satelllite,) "Fast" Eddie Coyle (late of KEGL-"Sunny 97.1,") John Roberts, "Hollywood" Henderson.  Oldies format began 4/1/2005 with an all-Beatles format, then to a "Jack FM" approach of no talk and random playing of hits across the 50s-90s decades on 5/24/2005.  Commercial free through 4/24/2006.
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KTRA, Dallas.  Call letters established 4/9/2001.  Format:  Fox Sports.  Owner:  Clear Channel.  Nickname:  "Extra Sports."  Station evolved into KFXR.
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KJOI, Dallas.  Call letters established 9/20/2000.  Format:  1950s/1960s Oldies (remaining from KLUV; format was to change to Christian Talk but never occurred,) Fox Sports (began under KJOI calls 2/8/2001.)  Call letters derived from "Joy."  Owner:  Radio One (purchased from Infinity for $16 million.)
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KLUV, Dallas.  Call letters established 8/17/1998.  Format:  Talk (8/17/1998-8/28/1998,) simulcast of KLUV-FM (8/28/1998-9/11/1998,) 1950s/1960s Oldies (9/11/1998-9/20/2000.)  Owner:  Infinity.  Nickname:  "Mighty 1190" (resurrected from the original KLIF-1190.)  Notables:  Don Imus (via satellite,) John Summers, Jay Walker (engineer.)  Sister station to KLUV-FM.  Second time to be a sister station of 98.7 FM.
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE
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KOOO, Dallas.  Call letters established 1/11/1997, but station was originally established as KEWS-FM on 3/29/1996 (some sources give KOOO's start date as 7/1/1997, but that is likely the date the station went with live programming to complement its syndicated offerings.)  Owner:  Infinity.  Format:  Talk/News, and partial simulcast of KRLD-AM (which was one of its sister stations.)  Nickname:  "K-Triple-O."  Notables: Jerry Bobo, Jay Walker (engineer,) Michael Spears, Mark Lambert, Don Imus (via satellite.)
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KDFX, Dallas.  Call letters established 11/3/1995.  Format:  Talk/News, Religious.   Station became KWRD-FM on 1/11/1997.  Notables:  Monte Johnson, Pete Stein, Don Imus (via satellite.)
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KGBS, Dallas.  Call letters established 8/17/1992.  Format:  Talk/News.  Owner: Greystone Broadcasting, Salem Communications.  Basic re-imaging of KUII.  See KUII below.
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KUII, Dallas.  Call letters established 2/4/1991.  Format:  CNN News.  Owner:  Susquehanna, Greystone Broadcasting.  Program:  "Sports First."  Notables:  Rob Milford aka Rob Williams (1993,) Gail Lee (Milford and Lee hosted the morning news program,) Mike Rogers, Judi Hanna, Bobby Brock, John Basham (weather,) Jim Long (entertainment reporter,) Dave Michaels (traffic,) Tim Freeman, Steve Dinkel, Steve West (OD,) Jeff Catlin (sports,) Richard Walker (morning show host,) Don Walker (SM,) Kim Satullo (sales,) Mary Gertz (sales,) Gail Lee aka Gail Force, Tom Scott (PD,) Ron Engelman (former KLIF morning show personality who hosted a talk show at KUII; got in trouble with federal authorities for sympathizing with the Branch Davidian group near Waco during their 1993 standoff,) Rob Chickering, Neil Ogenstein, Gerry Oher (concurrently with WFAA-TV; hosted "Sports First,") Tony Hill (former Dallas Cowboys player; hosted a sports program,) Mary Tyler, Scott Wilson (concurrently "Scorchin' Scotty" on KEGL-FM,) G. Gordon Liddy (via satellite, ) Morton Downey Jr. (who relocated his syndicated talk program to Dallas, 1/1993-10/1993.)  Simulcasted KDFW-Channel 4 News in 1991.
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KYII, Dallas.  Call letters established 12/7/1990 (other sources say 12/25/1990.)  Format:  CNN News.  Owner:  Susquehanna.  Temporary call letters for KUII.
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KLAF, Dallas.  Call letters established 11/29/1990.  Commercial-free simulcast of KLIF after move to 570 kHz; commercials were covered with detailed instructions to tune to KLIF's new home at 570.  Owner:  Susquehanna.
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KLIF, Dallas.  Station established 11/9/1947.  Format:  Entertainment/Sports (11/9/1947-5/1953,) Top 40 (5/1953-11/23/1977; stunting for Top 40 format consisted of a 24-hour playing of the "Dragnet" theme,) Adult Contemporary (11/23/1977-1/1/1981,) Country (1/1/1981-1985,) Country/Talk (1985-1/22/1986,) Talk (1/22/1986-11/29/1990.)  Former sister station to KROW-FM/KLIF-FM/KNUS-FM, and sister to KPLX-FM after Susquehanna purchase.  Legendary McLendon station, known for completely changing the face of modern radio.  Call letters derived from Oak Cliff, KLIF's original home.  Owners:  Liberty/McLendon Broadcasting (1947-1/31/1972, headed by Gordon McLendon (nicknamed "The Old Scotchman,") who is credited alongside radio entrepreneur Todd Storz as the inventor of the Top 40 format, and is also the creator of the first mobile news units, first "Game of the Day" baseball broadcasts, first use of jingles, first editorials, first all-news station and first easy listening station;) Fairchild Industries (1/31/1972-1980; reportedly, McLendon sold KLIF and his other Texas AM stations to keep them away from his wife during divorce proceedings; also, McLendon offered KNUS to Fairchild for a fire sale price, but Fairchild didn't want it; McLendon soon showed them the error of their ways by programming against KLIF and beating them;) Susquehanna Broadcasting (1980-present [see 570 kHz.])  Station moved to 570 kHz on 11/29/90.  Network affiliations:  NBC (during talk format,) LBS (McLendon's Liberty Broadcasting Service.)  Nickname:  "Mighty 1190" (1947-1979,) "Come Home to KLIF" (1979-1/1/1981,) "Country...Texas Style" (1/1/1981-81,) "Classic Country" (1981,) "Country Songs that Tell a Story" (1982-1/22/1986.)  News nicknames:  "20/20 News," "20/20 Double Power News."  Flagship station for the Dallas Cowboys, 1960-1971.

Programs:  "Coffee Capers," "Sunny Side Up," "Luncheon Music," "Moondial," "KLIF House Party," "Old Scotchman's Almanac," "Hillbilly Roundup" (also was on KXOL,) "Bandstand," "Lullabye in Rhythm," "Go to Town," "At Your Service," "Mellow's the Mood," "Candlelight and Gold," "Liberty Jamboree," "Joe Keith's Revolving Bandstand," "Great Day in the Morning," "Platter Shop," "Requestfully Yours," "David Reads the Bible," "Tops in Pops," "Harlem Hit Parade," "Snakepit" (With Chuck Boyles,) "Hotline" (with Rod Roddy; moved to KNUS and rerun on KLIF; resurrected on KFJZ-FM and later WFAA-AM by Ken Rundel,) "Girl Talk" (with Dave Ambrose,)  NBC Talknet (syndicated talk show programming.)  Promotions:  "KLIF Mystery House Number," "KLIF Mystery Telephone Number," "Money Drop," "School Spirit Contest," "Mystery Caller," "Mystery High School Hero," "Mystery Location," "Mystery Neighbor," Mystery Teen," Mystery Voices," "Mystery Walker," "Secret Word," "Girl Watching Festival," "Album Credit Card," "Cut-Up Contest" (c. 1974; pieces of several celebrity voices were played; whoever identified each of them won a huge jackpot [for reference, the final voice that stumped the whole town was Mike Love of the Beach Boys!]), "$50,000 KLIF Treasure Hunt," "KLIF Star Search" (1981,) "Urban Cowgirl" competition (1981,) throwing balloons with money taped to them off the top of the Adolphus Hotel, and a buried treasure contest (among MANY others!)  Mascot:  Klif the Parrot (1947.)

Notables as "Top 40:"  Charlie Van Dyke (12/1965-12/1968; returned 5/30/1977,) Wes Wise (former Dallas mayor and KDFW-TV anchor; assisted Gordon McLendon with sporting event re-creations,) Harry "Paxton" Mills, Ben Laurie, Ken "Hubcap" Carter, Dale Payne aka Jimmy Rabbitt, Don Keyes (PD, 1957-66,) Russel Lee Moore aka Russ "Weird Beard" Knight, Ken Dowe ("Ken Dowe and Granny Emma,") Michael Spears aka Hal Martin, Dave Ambrose (1966-1975,) Gordon "The Old Scotchman" McLendon (station owner, also did news commentary and early sports/entertainment programming,) Mike Williams aka Michael O'Shea (1967-1973; currently owner of All-Comedy Radio Network,) Lan Roberts, Michael Selden (to 1973; moved to KVIL-FM,) James Martin "Jim" Taber, Rod Roddy (later announcer for "Soap" and "The Price is Right,") Linwood "Cuzzin' Linnie" Henderson, Dickie Heatherton (brother of 1970s TV star Joey Heatherton; currently works in Rochester, NY,) Gary Owens (later "Laugh-In" announcer,) Ralph Chapman aka Ron Chapman/Irving Harrigan (1959-1965,) Chris Kerson, Tom Murphy (teamed with Irving Harrigan as "Murphy and Harrigan;" Tom and Ron came to Dallas together from a CT station,) Randy Robins, Alec Gifford, Chuck Dunaway, Allen Elwin aka Allen Farmer, Betsy Thaggard aka Kelly Clarke, Chantal Westerman, John Borders aka Johnny Dark, Doug Helton, "Big" Al Turner (host of "Hillbilly Roundup,") George Michael (of the syndicated "Sports Machine,") Kevin McCarthy, "Gentleman" Jim Carter (personality and driver of the KLIF Headliner Cruiser!), Rex Miller, Sam Pate, Reb Foster aka Dennis James, Charley Wright, Dick Kemp aka "The Wilde Childe," Jack Woods aka Charlie Brown (teamed with Irving Harrigan,) Frank Jolle, Wendell Jones aka Rex Jones, Ken McClure aka Ken Knox, Bruce Hayes, Dave Tucker, Todd Wallace, Dick Shannon aka Van Winkle, Mitch Carr (1975,) Bob Shuman, Rick Shaw, Bill Jenkins, Larry Dunkle aka Gary Mack (II), Scott Hodges, Larry Carolla, Bobby "Magic" Christian, Harry Birrell (retired; spent 1968-1993 at KNX-Los Angeles,) Myles Cameron, "Captain" Mike Ambrose (worked in LA radio, then spent over 25 years as a San Diego TV weatherman,) Don Berns, George Singer, Allen Nelson aka Art Nelson, Lee Brumm aka Lee Arthur, Elliott Field, Larry Wilson, Lou Staples (talk show host,) "Catfish" Jim Prewitt aka Larry Chase, Hugh Lampman, Tony Booth, Jim Davis, Nick Brounoff aka Nick Alexander (1976-78,) Victor Pryles aka Harry Nelson, Larry Shannon, Steve Scott, Mark Wesley, Stan Richards, Tony Gerald, John London and Ron Engelman (morning show co-hosts in the late 1970s; both had worked at KLIF in the early 1970s, and Engelman returned to 1190 [under the KUII calls] in 1992 to host a talk show,) Scott Hodges (1971-1972.)

Also Buddy Holiday, Brant Miller (currently does weather on WMAQ-Chicago,) Joe Long, Bill Meeks (longtime jingle producer; did first jingles for KLIF live!), Andy Waldrop, Ray Whitworth aka Ray Kennedy, Fred Edwards, Danny Patrick McCurdy aka Dan Patrick (a later "Charlie Brown,") Barry Kaye, Tom Newton aka Tom Kent, Frank Haley, Bob McCord, Mike Scott, Jim Oldman aka "Jumpin' " Jim O'Brien  (died doing an aerial radio stunt in Philadelphia where his parachute did not open; Peri Gilpin [Roz on "Frasier"] is his daughter,) Chuck Boyles, Gary DeLaune, Roy Nichols (Gary and Roy defected from KLIF's newsroom to KRLD-AM/TV on the same day,) Art Roberts, Stan White, Al Lurie (GM, 1957-1972,) Bill Stewart, Edd Routt, John Carter (Foshee), Dick Mock, Mike Hiott, Robert A. "Bob" Knowlton, Jim Rose (1972,) Bruce Hughes, Brad Messer, Alan Cole, Russ Barnett, Bill Enis, Bill Grady, Bill Robbins, Bob "The Milkman" Dayton, Gary Hamilton, Gary Cannon (engineer,) Gene Edwards, Mary Stoddard aka Mary Sanders (1963-64,) Bob Morrison (drove KLIF van in 1960s,) Glen Duncan, Jim Hilliard aka Jimmy Darren, Jim Randolph, Joe Holstead, Joel Sebastian, John Ravenscroft aka John Peel, Ken Reed (1958-59,) Kenny Sargent, Larry Monroe, Shalimar Allee, Marc Avery, Bob Presley, Bob Richmond, Dick Richmond, Paul Chappel, Jay Daniels, Paul Menard (a later "Harrigan,") Pete Gent (former Dallas Cowboys star and author of "North Dallas Forty,") Phil Allen, Ralph Baker, Ricky Ware, Ron Jenkins aka Ron McAlister, Rudy Rocha, Bob Shannon, Dave Mullstein, Sam Lee, Steve Mace, John Butler, Red Calhoun and Buster Smith (first black DJ team in Dallas,) Katharine Cobelle (called the "Society Editor of the Air,") James Collier, Sandee Stevens, Ted Agnew, Bob Stevens, Mike Scott (not the same person as KSCS's Michael Scott,) Brice Armstrong and Jack Auldridge (a later "Charlie and Harrigan" team,) Jack Woods ("Charlie Brown" of "Charlie and Harrigan,") Mark Lambert, James Bond, Jay Lawrence aka "Jaybird," Tom Whelan, Jim Reeves, Stacy Richardson (1970,) Art Riley, Dick Roth aka Dick Marshall, Joe Salvadore, Blackie Sherrod (longtime newspaper sports reporter,) John Tyler, Craig Slayton, Tracy Mitchell, Warren Anderson, Harold Hodo aka J. Walter Beethoven, Charlie Payne (GM,) Jerry Miller, Bruce Wayne, Cloyd Moll aka Cat Simon, Bob Hood (1968,) Lee Poole aka "Coyotee," Ordean Moen aka Deano Day, Larry Monroe, Chuck Murphy (1971-1975,) Glenn Callison (engineering director for McLendon stations, 1947-75,) Johnny Murray, Don McGregor, Lee Douglas, Les Vaughn, Buddy Harris, Malcolm Landess (also a news anchor for WFAA-TV,) Gene Edwards, Jimmie Jeffries (late of WFAA-AM,) Aubrey Escoe, Paul Gleiser (from 2/1972,) Lowell Gram, Frank Haley, Fred Hardy, Buddy Harris, Margaret (Meg) Healey, Kalten Heatter, Jim Howell, David Hultsman.

Also Jimmie Jeffries, Bob Johnston, Joe Keith, Mark Foster, Mark West, Mike Wade, Don Wade, Jim Davis, Todd Wallace, Dick Siegel (began 1968; returned under Country format in 1980,) Bud Watson, Chuck Blore, Howard Bogarte, Mike Snyder (current KXAS anchor,) Dean Tyler (operations manager after Susquehanna purchase.) Notables as "Country"Don Harris (hired away from a 16-year stint at WBAP-AM,) Bob Corbell, Dave Barkin, Jon Rivers, Gary Walker, John Nelson, Dick Siegel (traffic during 1980-1981; defected to WBAP with KPLX's Hal Jay,) David Coursey, Bill Smith aka Bill Mack (II) (fired at WBAP after a long stint in 1982; rejoined WBAP after KLIF changed from country,) Larry Carolla (1982,) Doyle King, Dan Bennett (PD,) Dan Halyburton (GM.)  When Country format was implemented, Harry Nelson (Victor Pryles,) Cuzzin' Linnie, John Carter (Foshee) and Jack Monroe were fired; Michael Selden was offered KPLX with a pay cut for staying, although he still occasionally filled in at KLIF.  (Note:  KLIF was already running NBC Talknet during the graveyard shift before switching formats to "Talk" on 1/22/1986.) Notables as "Talk":  David Gold (host of "The David Gold Show;" known as "The Conservative Freight Train,") Bob Ray Sanders, Dewayne Dancer, Norm Hitzges (host of "The Norm Hitzges Show;" began 1986,) Ed Busch, Greg Maiuro, Dr. Lynn Weiss (host of "The Dr. Lynn Weiss Show,") John Pendolino (host of "The Business Hours,") Dan Bennett, Dale Groom, Ed Calbridge, Karen Bloom and Art Snow (co-hosts of "At Your Service,") Mark Woolsey aka Mark Elliott (1985-1991; returned 1996-1999 at KLIF-570; currently a senior broadcast meteorologist for The Weather Channel in Atlanta,) Mike Early, Chuck Schechner, Mark Elliott, Jim Long, Sally Jessy Raphael, Bruce Williams (Williams as host of "Bruce Williams' Money and Financial Talk;" Raphael and Williams both via NBC Talknet satellite.)  Weekends on the "Talk" format included gardening, pets, fishing, home repairs and car care shows, along with Dallas Mavericks basketball, NFL Monday Night Football and Southwest Conference football.  Daytime only to 2/12/1950; 24 hours a day thereafter.  To 50,000 watts on 2/9/1959.  Station was located at the Cliff Towers Hotel, then 2100 Jackson St. (with the LBS network, which Sellers Recording took after LBS's failure,) 2108 Jackson St., then the best-remembered triangular, 2-story building at 2120 Commerce Street downtown (1964-1980; huge lit marquees touting KLIF [and later KNUS] events were mounted to it, along with neon call letters and large windows that allowed passing motorists to see the jocks at work,) moved to 411 Ryan Plaza in Arlington in 1980, and 3500 Maple in Dallas in late 1987.
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE

See an extensive history of KLIF on Steve Eberhart's website.

MISC KLIF TIDBITS...
In a strange early 1970s promotion, KLIF ran promos for a "KLIF Becomes a Thing of the Past" stunt; the station inexplicably took an entire day off, while making listeners believe the station was going dark for good!  Although the signoff was probably for repairs, leave it to Gordon McLendon to exploit it for all it was worth!

The fate of Top 40 AM was sealed at KLIF on 11/23/1977, in an event employees termed the "Thanksgiving Massacre."  With FM stealing most of AM's ratings by then, KLIF resorted to drastic measures to save the station.  A flip to Adult Contemporary was immediately implemented.  Fired were Randy Robins, Jim Davis, Ray Whitworth, Charlie Deaton, Bob Shuman, Mike Wade and GM Edd Routt.  Charlie Van Dyke was promoted to PD and moved himself from mornings to afternoons, John Tyler was brought in as GM, London and Engelman were hired by Van Dyke for mornings, Andy Waldrop was moved up from promotions to weekend jock, and Dick Siegel and Nick Alexander were hired to fill out the jock schedule.  Siegel, later the wise-cracking airborne traffic reporter on WBAP, was the unlikely host of "Studio 1190" on Saturday nights, an all-disco music show in 1978.

During the early 1980s, billboards across town promoted KLIF's "Country Songs that Tell a Story" format by posting humorous and thought-provoking lines from country songs, like "She's so ugly/She makes my cat bark," "For a good girl/She ain't half bad," "Take the 'L' out of 'lover' and it's 'over,'" "She got the goldmine/I got the shaft," etc.

Special thanks to Susquehanna senior VP Dan Halyburton for providing me with a copy of the book, "Susquehanna Radio:  The First Fifty Years," which provided otherwise unfindable answers to the history of post-McLendon KLIF and Susquehanna's presence in the DFW market...thanks, Dan!


1220

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KZEE, Weatherford.  Station established 8/12/1956.  Format:  Radio Desi (brokered,) Oldies, Country.  Owners:  J. Fred Case dba Bartlesville Broadcasting Company, Horace Bowen, Tarrant Radio Broadcasting (bought 9/5/2001.)  Notables:  Don Swancy (9/1968-5/1969,) Jerry Condra aka Jerry Parks, Nell Owen, Howard Greenblatt (ND and personality,) Bud McKool (both late of KBUY,) John McCarty.

1240
(242 meters)

KFPM, Greenville. Station established 4/17/1924 at 1310 kc (moved to 1240 after 1929;) dark in 3/1935.  Format:  Sports, Country and Western, Variety (local talent, records, civic events and local news.)  Owner:  Dave Ablowich Sr dba New Furniture Store.  Flagship station for Greenville High School football.  Broadcasted services from the Kavanaugh Church on Sundays.  Station broadcasted at 10 watts, then later 15 watts.  Notables:  Dave Ablowich Jr (engineer; son of owner,) Ernest Hackworth Jr aka "Uncle Dudley" (began 1931.)  Studios located at 2316 Johnson Street at Jordan, on the 2nd floor overlooking the New Furniture Store (three rugs hung from the ceiling blocked off the studio area.)  Homemade transmitter located on the entire 2100 block of Park St on the south side of the street.  Listenership reported from 40 states, Canada and even New Zealand!  Ablowich started out as a ham operator in 1920, and applied for KFPM in 1924.

1250

WPHG284, Duncanville.  Low-power station broadcasting city of Duncanville information.

And separately, serving the Sherman-Denison market:

Unknown, Denison.  Licensed 11/5/1941, but unknown if station ever signed on.  Owner:  Denison Texoma Broadcast Company.


1270
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KFLC, Fort Worth. Call letters established 2/23/2004.  Format:  Spanish Talk.  Nickname:  "La Voz del Pueblo" ("The Voice of the Town.")  Owner:  Univision (bought 9/22/2003; apparently is the second time Univision has owned this frequency.)  Notables: Jose Guzman (former Texas Rangers baseball player,) Eleno Ornelas.  Spanish flagship for Texas Rangers, Dallas Cowboys and Dallas Mavericks.  Call letter change was to prevent radio diary confusion between KESS-FM (music) and KESS-AM (talk.)  CP on file to bump up from 5,000 watts to 50,000 watts as of 2005.  KFLC calls were once used in Dallas at 1330 kc in 1924 for a temporary station set up at the State Fair of Texas.

KESS, Fort Worth.  Call letters re-established 4/29/1991.  Format:  Spanish, Spanish Talk.  Owners:  Univision (formerly Hispanic Broadcasting [to 6/2002] and formerly Heftel [to 5/1999]) (1994-?.)  Nickname:  "La Fabulosa."  Program:  "Voice of Texas."  Notables:  Rossy Garza, David Cruz (host of "Voice of Texas,") Jim Lowe.

KSBN, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 9/19/1990.  Format:  Spanish.

KESS, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 11/17/1986.  Format:  Spanish. Traded frequencies with KSSA-94.1 FM after the 11/17/1986 frequency switch that permanently sent 93.9's occupant to 94.1.
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KSSA, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 1/20/1984.  Format:  Spanish.  Call letters derived from "casa."  Owner:  Founders Broadcasting (to 3/1986,) Marcos Rodriguez (3/1986-?.)  Calls were resurrected at 1600 AM on 8/5/1987, although they were still in use by KSSA-FM after trading frequencies with KESS on 11/17/1986.
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KFJZ, Fort Worth.  Call letters re-established 8/15/1939 at 1240 kc (moved from 1370 kc; see entry there) and to 1270 kc on 3/29/1941. Format:  Top 40 (1970s,) Jazz and Standards (officially "Al Ham's Music of your Life") (1980-1984,) Swing (1985,) Entertainment.  Nickname:  "Music of Your Life," "King-Z," "From Beethoven to Boogie" (1940s.)  Call letters stood for "Fort Worth Jazz" (1980-84; a backronym.)  Sister station to KFJZ-FM/KEGL-FM and KFJZ/KTVT-Channel 11.  Network affiliation:  ABC, Mutual, TSN.  Call letters and format moved to 870 AM in 1/1984.  Former owners:  Elliot and Ruth Roosevelt dba Fort Worth Broadcasters (8/15/1939-1945; paid $101,570 for it; Elliot was FDR's son,) Sid Richardson dba Tarrant Broadcasting (1945-1960; had owned predecessor KTAT in the 1930s; purchased KFJZ directly from Ruth Roosevelt, who was awarded the station in divorce proceedings,) Arnold/Audrey Malkan dba Pyrometer Company of America in partnership with former KFJZ manager Stan Wilson (10/22/1964-2/1972; bought TSN and AM/FM/TV stations for $1 million;) Communications Properties (2/1972-10/2/1976; bought AM/FM/TSN for $4 million,) Swanson Foods (10/2/1976-11/1983,)  Founders Broadcasting (11/1983-3/1986, through call letter change to KSSA.)  Programs:  "The Shadow," "Sidetrack," "Neighbors," "Swap Shop," "Erskine Johnson in Hollywood," "Freedom of Opportunity," "Cedric Foster," "Quick as a Flash," "Nick Carter," "The Fresh-Up Show," "Gabriel Heatter," Queen for a Day," "Take it Easy Time," "Morton Downey [Sr.]," "Guy Lombardo," "The Insomnia Club," "Terrible Terry's Stomping Grounds," "Texas Pharmaceutical Hour," "Bing Crosby Sings," "Real Life Story," "Spotlight Bands," "Rouges Gallery," "The Coffee Club," "What's the Name of that Song?"  Notables:  Porter Randall, Bill Enis (as host of "The Coffee Club" and "Swap Shop,") Mark Stevens aka Mark E. Baby (later teamed with Jim Pruett to form "Stevens and Pruett" on KEGL and later on KLOL-Houston,) Jim Thomas, Mark Oristano, Martha Martinez, Dave Tucker (1/1967-1974; late of KBOX-AM,) Don Tennison, Patrick Dearen aka Marlin Spike McGuire, Charlie Ross, Richie Allen, Larry Shannon aka Biff Burns (began 1968; teamed with Mark Stevens [aka Mark E. Baby] for mornings in the 1970s; Shannon also hosted "Sidetrack,") Randy Brown aka Christopher Haze, Alton Stricklin, David Cockrell aka David London/David Laurence, Jim Lowe (1943-1947,) John Borders aka Johnny Dark.

Also "Big" George Erwin (host of "Coffee Cup Caper" morning show,) Harrel Banks, Randy "Big R" Robins, Ken "Hubcap" Carter, Randy Vick Sr., Rick Wais (1982,) Blanchard McKee (as host of "Neighbors,") Dave Naugle (as host of "The Insomnia Club,") "Uncle" Walter Moore, Joan Morgan, Rob Milford aka Rob Williams (11/1975 to 8/1976,) "Truckin' Tom Cookin' Kent, Larry Thompson aka Larry James, Peter McClain, Jerry Park, Earle Fletcher (1941,) David Day, Lee Randall, Ralph "Buddy" Widman (1940s,) Curtis Pierce, Sid Burns, Zack Hurt, Karl King, Howard Greenblatt (personality and public affairs director,) Charlie Butts, George Nolen, Jack Hudson, Hazel Riley (secretary, 1945-57,) Marvin Hillis, Mackie Baird (Beard?), Art Snow, Jim Rose (MD/jock, 1973-76, under both Top 40 and Country formats; worked concurrently at KJIM-AM as "Jim Nelson" [PD Ray Potter would not let Rose use the same name on both stations!]), Kathy Alcala-Downs, Ray Menefee, Mike Marshall (1/1964-3/1967,) Lee Randall, Jim Van Sickle (1968-80,) Johnny Smith, Stan Wilson (I) (1940-60; launched KFJZ-TV in 1955, and later the Dallas Cowboys Radio Network; partnered with Arnold and Audrey Malkin to buy the station in 1964,) Robert Mitchell, "Deacon" Don Evans, Ray Potter (PD,) Bruce Buchanan aka Jim Edwards, Mike Downs, Ron Wortham, David Day, Chem Terry (hosted "Terrible Terry's Stomping Grounds,") Dan Allison, Joe Holstead, Bob Barry (not the same as KDNT's Bob Berry,) Beau Weaver, Russ Lamb (morning show host,) Allen Klaus and Keating Chase (as jokesters "Snuffy and Puffy" on Russ Lamb's morning show,) Lee Galceran, Booker Turner, Forrest Clough, Phyllis Stroupe, Skeeter Gordon, Tommy Medeno, Charles Meade, Roy Duffy, Johnny Lee Smith, Ken McClure aka Ken Knox, Lee Ann Kneisle, Ray Coday Jr aka Ray Lincoln, Jack Gallo, Jack "Mother" Murray, John Lee, Tee Casper, Gene Cagle (announcer in 1933; later owned the station,) Wally Blanton, Jon Powers, Cal Druxman (sales,) Scott Allen, Richie Allen, Jon Rivers, John Lee Smith, Charles Hobbie, Harley Bellew, Gene Ashcraft aka Gene Craft, John Foshee aka John Carter, Mike Millard, Jim Simon, Hap Arnold, Stan White, Jim Pratt, Red Barber, Don Dunphy, John Moncrief, Jefferson "John" Hopkins, Danny Moffat.   Power increase to 1,000 watts in 8/1939 and to 5,000 watts in 1941.  Throughout the 1940s and 1950s, WRR and KFJZ were marketed together to advertisers as one-stop shopping to cover both Dallas and Fort Worth.  Station located at 1201 Lancaster Blvd. (1939-1955,) 4801 West Freeway (IH-30) (1955-1975 with KFJZ/KTVT-TV; leased same studios after Gaylord bought sister station KTVT-TV in 1962,) 5915 Pioneer Parkway (1975-1984.)
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE

KTAT, Fort Worth.  Call letters re-established 1/31/1935 (traded back with KGKO-570.)  See notes under KTAT (1929) below.  Owners:  Sid Richardson dba Tarrant Broadcasting, Elliot and Ruth Roosevelt dba Fort Worth Broadcasters (owned briefly under KTAT calls before changing to KFJZ.)  Notable:  Don Naylor.  For 11 hours, KTAT was the flagship of the new Texas State Network; once technical issues were resolved later that day, Tarrant moved its existing KFJZ from 1370 to 1240, and cancelled KTAT's license.  (See entry at 1370 for more information.)

KGKO, Fort Worth.  Moved from 570 kc on 1/13/1935 (traded with KTAT) and moved back to 570 on 1/31/1935.  See entry at 570 for more information.
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KTAT, Fort Worth.  Call letters re-established 4/23/1930 at 1240 kc.  See KTAT (1929) entry below.  Owners:  A. P. Barrett dba Texas Air Transport (re-acquired from parent company Southern Air Transport,) Sid Richardson dba Tarrant Broadcasting (bought in early 1930s.)  Notable:  Don Naylor.

KSAT, Fort Worth.  Call letters established (and station re-established) 11/9/1929.  Owner:  Southern Air Transport (parent of Texas Air Transport.)

KTAT, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 1/6/1929 at 1280 kc; dark after 1/12/1929.  Format:  Entertainment.  Owners:  A. P. Barrett dba Texas Air Transport, Sid Richardson dba Tarrant Broadcasting, Raymond E. Buck. Network affiliation:  CBS.  Programs:  "Old Man Rhythm," "Barrel of Melody," "Musical Memories," "Happiness Hour," "Home Builders," "Coffee Club," "Sports Flashes," "Honeyboy and Sassafras."  Notables:  Frank Bird, A. B. Tinsley, Sam Bennett (GM,) Harry Waters (chief announcer and station director,) Bill Warren, Frank Dinkins.  In October, 1928, KFQB was sold by W. B. Fishburn to A. P. Barrett dba Texas Air Transport.  Barrett changed the calls to KTAT, and control of the station was returned to J. Frank Norris (Norris, by the way, had kept a percentage of ownership during all transactions, and owned the Sunday 11AM-12PM timeslot for his church services.)  Studios were then built next to the church.  On National Frequency Allocation Day, 11/11/1928, KTAT was awarded 1280 kc (other sources say 1240 kc.)  Tragedy struck on 1/12/1929, as the church and tower were completely lost to a fire, after only six days on the air.  The station was dark until 11/9/1929, when Texas Air Transport's parent company, Southern Air Transport, acquired the frequency.  Shared time with WACO-Waco. Broadcasted with 1,000 watts.

KTAT TIDBITS:
The station's premiere was a remote from the Crystal Ballroom of the Texas Hotel in downtown Fort Worth.  Guests from radio stations across the state did much of the broadcasting; local representatives included WFAA's Adams Calhoun and Robert Pool, WRR's John Thorwald, KRLD's Arthur Stowe, WBAP's Harold "Hired Hand" Hough, and KGKO's Zack Hurt and Glenn Hewitt.
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KFQB, Fort Worth.  Station established on 5/12/1924 at 618.6 kc (later to 590 kc in 1926, then 1180 kc, then 1140 kc, then 1150 kc, then 900 kc [other sources say to 920 kc in 9/1927,] then 1240 kc.)  Format:  Religious, Entertainment.  Call letters stood for "Keep Folks Quoting the Bible."  Owners:  J. Frank Norris, J. M. Gilliam, W. B. Fishburn.  Programs:  "Fishburn's Two Little Maids," "Radio Bible Class," "Vespers."  Notables:  Glenn Hewitt and Zack Hurt, ("Glenn and Zack,") Louis E. Diehl, "Bill and Ernest" (blind saxophone and piano players,) "Jack and Bill" (the KFQB "Lullabye Boys,") H. B. "Colonel" Greene (engineer.)  When WPA-AM was abandoned in 1923 (see entry at 618.6,) Rev. J. Frank Norris (dba Search-Light Publishing) bought the transmitter from the Fort Worth Record and used it to start up 5,000-watt station KFQB in 1924.  Norris was the pastor of the First Baptist Church of Fort Worth, and based the studios there.  The tower was located on top of the church (other sources say it was mounted to the Farmers and Mechanics National Bank building downtown.)  Norris was a Fundamentalist Baptist who, in 1912, was accused of burning down his own church, and was given 30 days to leave town by area deacons (he defied them and stayed.)  He was also said to have murdered a business associate in 1926, but used his connections to get out of it!  Later, he was expelled from the Southern Baptist Convention for his anti-evolution beliefs and preachings, as the theory of evolution was endorsed and taught at SBC's Baylor University. During his ownership of KFQB, Norris held an 18-day crusade against evolution in Nashville, and he later testified alongside William Jennings Bryan at the famous Scopes-Monkey Trial.  On 10/25/1926, he sold the station to J. M. Gilliam (business manager of Search-Light,) who changed the format from religious to entertainment, and hired Glenn Hewitt and Zack Hurt ("Glenn and Zack,") to host a comedy program.  Gilliam relocated the studios to the basement of the Westbrook Hotel, 4th and Houston in downtown (although the tower still remained at Norris' church.)  He sold KFQB a year later to W. B. Fishburn (of Fishburn's Dry Cleaners, still operating today) on 12/12/1927 for $8,500.   Station shared time with WJAD-Waco.

Thanks to Bill Fairlie (FW Star-Telegram,) Richard Schroeder, UT-Arlington Special Collections and the Fort Worth Public Library's clipping file for much of the above information.


1310
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KTCK, Dallas.  Call letters established 2/8/1994, but format began on 1/23/1994 under KAAM calls.  Format:  Sports Talk.  Owner:  Spence Kendrick and Geoffrey Dunbar dba Cardinal Communications (1993-1995,) SFX (1995-1996; SFX bought by CBS in 12/1996;) Susquehanna Broadcasting (12/1996-present; paid $14 million for it.)  Nickname:  "The Ticket" (thought of by Renee Rhyner, Mike's wife; Mike and Greg Williams sold investors on "Ticket" concept.)  Simulcast on KTBK-AM (in stereo) and KTDK-FM.  Notables:  Rocco Pendola, Slip Bayless (longtime newspaper sports columnist; very first person to broadcast on station,) Gordon Keith, Bruce Gilbert, Bob Sturm, Gregg Williams, Max Miller (to 7/1998,) George Dunham, Norm Hitzges, Mark Followill, Mike Rhyner, Chris Arnold, Chuck Cooperstein, Hank McMonigle, Barbara "Barb" Smith, Jim Lowe.  Simulcasted to KTBK-1700 and KTDK-104.1.  When Cardinal purchased KAAM from Bonneville, they kept the studio briefly at its original home, 15851 Dallas Parkway, in order to renovate the former KVIL studios at 5307 Mockingbird (in the Capital Bank building, which Cardinal owned)...KTCK moved into the refurbished studios in 1/1994.
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KAAM, Dallas.  Call letters established 1/1978.  Format:  All News (carried over from WRR) to 6/12/1978; AC Gold (to 4/1981,) SMN Adult Contemporary format via satellite (4/1981-8/1982,) Pop Oldies (8/1982-3/8/1986,) Big Band/Standards (officially "Al Ham's Music of your Life" [formerly at KFJZ]) (3/8/1986-1993; dark briefly until 1/23/1994, when Ticket format signed on briefly under KAAM calls.)  Owner:  Bonneville Broadcasting (1/1978-11/1993.) Nicknames:  "Big Bands, Great Singers," "Discover the Gold," "K-Double-A-M."  Sister station to KAFM-FM/KZPS-FM (1/1978 to 11/1993.)  KAAM name and format was resurrected at 620 AM in 10/1995 and at 770 AM in 11/1998. Promotion:  "$500,000 Trivia Challenge" (1984.)  Programs:  "Jerry Jones Show," "Travel Talk," "Sleepers," "The Larry King Show" (syndicated,) "Sock Hop Shop," "Hymns We Love" (started at WFAA-AM in 1952; ran until 12/12/1993 on KAAM,) "Historic Moments."  Notables:  Dave Johnson and Glenn Mitchell (co-hosts of "Sleepers,") did afternoon news for Robin Jones and Russell Martin,) Dick Roth aka Dick Marshall, Tony Garrett/Dick Hitt/Judi Hanna (morning team; fired 4/1981 at format change,) Steve Simmons, Steven "Stubie" Doak (10/1982-1983; moved to sister station KZPS,) William Steding, "Rockin'" Robin Jones, Vicki Robbins, Charles Kuenzi aka Johnny Michaels, Cerie Segal (as host of "Travel Talk,") Nancy Jay, Gerry Oher, Mark Lambert, Larry Carolla, Lee Gray, Jim Lowe, Sandy Singer, Ben McGregor, Ron Knowles (began 1/7/1988,) Howard Greenblatt (1/1978-1/4/1988; first jock heard on KAAM,) Bret Lewis, Jack Grady, Chris Allen, Jim Thomas and Leon McWhortor aka Jay Roberts (I) (co-hosting "Solid Gold Saturday Night,") Dave Mitchell, Phil Markert, Beverly Margolis, Stu Bowers, Tom Hopkins, Terry Bell, Bob Paterson, Brian Moran, Ed Spencer, Tom Glade, Norvell Slater (host of "Hymns We Love,") Chris Allen, Jeff Mitchell, A. C. Greene (as host of "Historic Moments,") Russell Martin.  Located at Fair Park (briefly until sale from WRR was completed,) 12750 Park Central #512 (6/12/1978-?) and 15851 Dallas Parkway (?-1994.)
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE
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WRR, Dallas.  Station legally established 8/4/1921 as the second licensed station in the US, but began broadcasting without a license in Fall, 1920.  Format:  Public Service (1920-1927,) Talk (1927-early 1970s,) Contemporary Oldies (early 1970s-1974,) All News/Talk (1974-6/12/1978.)  Call letters stand for "Where Radio Radiates" (also said to be "White Rock Radio," for its proximity to that Dallas lake; the tower was once located on nearby Flagpole Hill; jokesters used to say, "We Reach Rockwall"!)  Nickname:  "Fun Radio."  Owner:  City of Dallas/City of Dallas Police Fire and Signal Department (fire department gave up control to the city in 1931.)  Originally broadcasted at 20w (1920,) 100w (1921,) 500w (1925,) 5kW (1940) and at 833 kc, 1220 kc, 1150 kc, 850 kc, 650 kc, 1190 kc (1928-?, on a timeshare plan with WOAI-San Antonio) and 1280 kc (through at least 1935.)  Network affiliation:  Mutual/MBS, NBC News and Information Service (1974-?,) TSN.  First licensed radio station in Texas (and second in the US,) first news/talk station in Dallas, first station to regularly feature traffic reports ("Fina Traffic Report," began 1962.)  Original Dallas Cowboys flagship station (although research has also turned up KRLD as the original flagship station from 1960-71, and KBOX from 1960-1962.)  Flagship station for Dallas Rebels and SMU basketball teams, and the Dallas Texans football team (1960-1963, until their move to Kansas City to become the Chiefs.)  WRR was originally used as a communications system for the Dallas Fire Department (1920-1922; although discussions of developing a two-way radio system date back to 1916,) and firemen did the air personality work!  Programs:  "Kats Karavan Show," "Blues Karavan" ("Kats" and "Blues" ran back to back; Jim Lowe hosted both, and "Kats" was taped concurrently as Lowe did his morning program,) "Jukebox Serenade," "Jett's Talk of the Town," "Al Jones Show," "The Laurel Ornish Show," "Who's Who in Radio," "Charlie the Collector Show," "Nancy Goodman Show," "Kiddie's Club," "Pet Time," "Coffee Time."

Notables:  John Stone (the Southwest's first disc jockey, in 1920!), Frank Glieber (1956-1959; disc jockey and host of the "F. G. Show,") Brad Sham, Doug Helton, Bruce Hayes, "Gentleman" Jim Carter, Lee Brumm aka Lee Arthur, Buddy Harris, Dan Squibb, Dave Naugle, Pete Mood, Jim Lowe (1950-1974; host of the rhythm-and-blues "Kats Karavan Show" from 1953-1967, as well as "Blues Karavan," and Lowe was the longtime voice of "Big Tex" at the Texas State Fair; Lowe was nicknamed 'Tiger, the Old Cool Fool' on the air!), Roy Newman (staff musician,) John Ravenscroft aka John Peel, Bob Warren, Ron Wortham, Bob Jett (host of "Jett's Talk of the Town,") John Roosevelt, Al Jones (1943-1956; as host of "Al Jones Show,") Marvin Williams, Edwin Bryant (as half of "The Pair of Peppers" duo.)

Also Joe Hickman, Dave Cook (not the same as Dave Cooke of KRLD,) John Henry Faulk, Hal King (concurrently an Irving police officer,) Brice Armstrong, Ben Smith, Fulton Lewis Sr., Fulton Lewis III, Rob Milford aka Rob Williams (10/1977,) Eddie Hill, John Miller (not the WBAP/KXAS/WFAA news director,) Bob Kelly, Kenny Sargent (personality and singer who recorded, "Under a Blanket of Blue,") Clyde White aka Jim White (I) (1967-1969,) James Alderman, Charlie Haggard (host of "Charlie the Collector Show,") Rick Teddlie (engineer; co-creator of CONELRAD emergency system,) Dale Berry, William Boyd, Ocie Brisby, "Handyman" Al Carrell, Victor Cortinas, Pat Couch (later reporter for KXAS-TV,) Jerry Doggett (1941-1956; announcer for Dallas Rebels and SMU basketball teams,) Chuck Duncan, Cedric Foster, G. Guy Gibson, Lois Goldthwaite, Roy Parks, Nancy Leitstein (Brinker) aka Nancy Goodman (host of "Nancy Goodman Show;" once married to restaurant mogul Norman Brinker,) L. B. Henson, Norm Hitzges, Taylor Branch, David Hultsman, John Thorwald, Harry James, George Gimarc, Ron Knowles, Tim Jernigan, Ray LaPere, Jim Lawrence, Joe McChesney (formerly "J. Morgan Van Buren" on KBOX,) Sterling "Mac" McClain (host of "Who's Who in Radio,") Brian Melton, Bob Norman, Laurel Ornish (1972-1973, 1974; hosted "The Laurel Ornish Show;" first woman newscaster in local radio; returned in 1974 when station went All-News/Talk,) Ted Parrino (1930s,) Paul Pryor (son of "Cactus" Pryor, early Austin, TX radio-TV vet,) Vickie Robbins, Edd Routt, Brad Sham (in his first broadcasting job, 1972,) Neil Sperry, Jess Smith, Patricia Smith, Durward Tucker (began 1933,) Tom Tully, Ken Walters, Mark Lambert, Mark Willis, Sybil Robson (niece of WalMart's Sam Walton; worked as a traffic reporter in mid-1977.)

Station band:  The Dallas Athletic Club Symphony Orchestra.  WRR's tower at Fair Park fell on 6/23/1977.  WRR was first located at 2012 Main Street, downtown, on the 2nd floor of the fire station.  In 1923, WRR moved to the Jefferson Hotel.  Then in 1925, it moved to the Adolphus Hotel downtown, then to the Southland Life Building's 10th floor in the 1930s, and to Fair Park from 1936-1973:  first, it was next to the Hall of State Building on the Fair Park grounds, then moved next to the coliseum thereafter, where it still resides today.  During WWII in 1945, a German POW camp was located next door to the station at Fair Park.  Throughout the 1940s and 1950s, WRR and KFJZ were marketed together to advertisers as one-stop shopping to cover both Dallas and Fort Worth.  WRR applied for a television station on Channel 10 in 1950, but the channel was reassigned to Waco when the FCC lifted their freeze on new TV applications in 1952.  Visit WRR's former sister station, WRR-FM, on the web...they have an excellent photo gallery of the history of WRR-AM on their site...click here.
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1330

KFLC, Dallas.  Station established 10/13/1923; dark on 10/27/1923.  Format:  Variety.  Owner:  R. A. Hall.  Station set up exclusively for two-week broadcast of the State Fair of Texas.  Calls later resurrected at 1270 kc.



1340

KAND, Corsicana.  Station established 5/17/1937 at 1310 kc; moved to 1340 in 1947.  Format:  Variety (1937-1980s,) Country (1980s-5/31/2008,) Talk (6/1/2008-present.)  Owners:  J. C. West (5/19/1937-3/15/1955,) Lee Glasgow (3/15/1955-1964,) Richard Parker dba KAN-D Land Inc/Corsicana Cable TV (1964-1995,) Corsicana Media Inc/Northland Cable TV (1995-3/15/2008; bought for $500,000,) Yates Communications (bought 3/15/2008.)  Nicknames:  "Country Music for Today's Texans," "Green Radio" ("Green Radio" format began online in late 2007; began on KAND 6/1/2008.)  Flagship station for Corsicana High School Tigers and Navarro College Bulldogs football games.  Former sister station to KAND-FM (aka KXCL-FM and KCIR-FM.)  Programs:  "Talk Time," "Texas Stomp."  Notables as "Variety" and "Country":  Alan Barnes, Steve Elkins, Perry Taylor (1949-1985,) Paul Trevor, Kevin McAdams, Dee Andra Huckaby, Dixie Lawrence, Michael Spears, Dewey Beale, Nick Brounoff aka Nick Alexander, "Uncle" Gus and "Aunt" Louise Foster (hosted "Texas Stomp,") Perry Taylor, Jerry Litteral aka Jerry Houston, Don Hupp, Ron Ricks, Paul Berry, Mary Sikes, Margie Holton, Bill Van Ness, "Ramblin'" Roy Miller, Jerry Hancock (took over mornings after Roy Miller's death in 2007,) Steve Kelly, Aubrey Escoe, H. L. Cofer, Margie Holton, Annette Gonzales (later in Houston television,) Miles Taylor, Barry Bragg, Byron Haney, Lex Myers, Dick Aldama, Bob Belcher, Joe Salvadore, Ray Murphy, Bob Knoll, Elmer Smith.  Notables as "Green Radio":  Kevin McCarthy, David Yates (owner, and former jock at KAND in the 1980s,) Alex Burton. Original owner J. C. West, who also owned the Wolf Brand (canned) Chili plant in Corsicana, used chili as part of employee compensation!  He applied for the calls "WOLF," but the FCC wouldn't permit it, as "W" calls are confined exclusively to stations east of the Mississippi River.


1360
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KMNY, Hurst.  Call letters established 3/4/2005.  Format:  Spanish (under KMNY calls to 3/31/2005,) Business Talk and Variety (4/1/2005-5/23/2008; daytime: via LMA from BizRadio Network [BizRadio bought KJSA-1110 AM in 4/2008; simulcasted programming on 1360 and 1110 4/27/2008-5/23/2008; completed transition to 1110 AM on 5/23/2008;]) Modern Classic Rock/80s Pop/Variety (as "Retro Radio," 5/24/2008-6/30/2008;) nights: brokered Spanish, Chinese or other ethnic programming to 10/1/2006; unsold nights were automated M-O-R; then Spanish (via HCCA Network) 10/1/2006-12/2007, then Progressive Talk ("Rational Radio," 1/28/2008-date; switched to 24/7 schedule 7/1/2008.) Owner:  Multicultural Radio Broadcasting/MRBI (2/4/2004-present.)  Call letters stand for "money."  Sister station to KDFT-540.  Affiliations:  As Progressive Talk - NovaM (progressive talk network that dissolved in 2/2009,) Air America.  Program:  "The Hi-Fi Club" (6/18/2006- 9/24/2006; 12/30/2007-date; a resurrection of the 1959-1962 "Coca Cola Hi-Fi Club" from KXOL-1360.)  Notables as "BizRadio":  Ray Whitworth (producer, 2005-2007,) Daniel Frishberg (as host of "The MoneyMan Report;" heads BusinessRadio Partners,) Vince Rowe (to 9/28/2006; returned 1/2007,) Lou Dobbs (via satellite from CNN,) Brent Clanton (to 5/2008,) Mike Norman, Mike Shannon (II) (producer, 7/2005-5/2007,) Jim Cramer, Ed Moyer, Scott Murray (2/2006-4/2006; former KXAS-TV sports director.) Notables as "Rational Radio":  Dave Clifton, Irv Jackson aka Jack Bishop (2006-2010; late of KAAM; handled public affairs programming for KMNY, then appointed local manager of Rational Radio in 2008,) Bill Press, Stephanie Miller, Thom Hartman, Randi Rhodes (to 2/2009,) Ed Schultz, Mike Malloy (all via satellite;) Mike Shannon (II), John Lewis and Ray Whitworth (all as host of "The Hi-Fi Club.")  Notables as "Retro Radio": Mike Shannon (II) (PD, and host of "The Hi-Fi Club,") Bud Buschardt, Jim Thomas (as host of "70s Saturday Afternoon," an update of his long-running "70s Saturday Night" program on KDMX-FM and KBFB-FM;) Joe Fuchs aka Jay Weaver, Randy Carlisle (host of "The Real Oldies Show;") John Lewis (host of "The 1360 Jazz Cafe;" Larry Stanley (host of "The Larry Stanley Show;") Jeff Allen, Steph Quinn, Ray Whitworth, Doyle King. Notables in management, and during other broadcast hours:  Ted Sauceman (Dallas Market Manager,) Mike Shannon (II), Ray Whitworth and John Lewis (all hosts of "The Hi-Fi Club.")  BizRadio's sister station in Houston (initially KXYZ-1320 AM, leased also through MRBI; now at owned KTEK-1110 AM) was formatted and financed by Frishberg and a coalition of listeners in 2/2005 who were left without a business talk station when Infinity's KIKK-650 AM switched to Hot Talk in 9/2004; Frishberg, a former host on KIKK, brought format to DFW two months later.  KMNY paid homage to its roots on 11/22/2006 by playing long-lost clips of KXOL-1360 news coverage of the JFK assassination.  The KMNY calls were salvaged from another MRBI property in Pomona, CA; calls were originally obtained for and by the defunct "Money Network" in the 1980s (the former KAHZ calls were exchanged with Pomona's KMNY.)  Station located at Red Bird Mall (later Southwest Center Mall, to 10/2005,) then to 5801 Marvin D. Love Frwy (10/2005-present.)

KAHZ, Fort Worth (later Hurst.)  Call letters established 9/24/1993.  Format:  Spanish Talk (?-3/31/2005,) Religious/Roman Catholic Talk (11/1/1998-?,) Radio Aahs via satellite (9/24/1993-1/30/1998; sale of the Radio Aahs parent company Children's Broadcasting Corporation fell through on that date, and Children's permanently pulled the plug on the format; owners also blamed the success of competitor Radio Disney, and subsequently sued Disney for copyright infringement.)  Owners:  Children's Broadcasting, Global Broadcasting (announced 6/1997, but apparently fell through on 1/30/1998,) Radio Unica, Multicultural Radio Broadcasting (rescued KAHZ from bankrupt Radio Unica on 2/4/2004.)  Notables:  Bob Bruton (SM,) Ted Sauceman, Eric Roberts, Crystal Preston, Gretchen Vawter, Stephanie Steele, Nicole Caylor, Brad Lane (OM,) Waymon Preston, Keith Whipple.  Station located in Hurst, then to Red Bird Mall.
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KNRB, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 6/1/1988.  Format:  Country, Religious, Religious/Talk (6/1992-?.)  Nickname:  "Praise 1360." Flagship station for the Fort Worth Fire hockey team (1992-93.) Notable:  Dave Barnett.
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KWJS, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 11/23/1985.  Call letters stood for "Word of Jimmy Swaggart" (calls resurrected from 94.9 FM, who abandoned them in 1984.  Station was not owned by Jimmy Swaggart as 94.9 FM was, but carried programming from Swaggart's network.)  Owner:  Universal Broadcasting.  Format:  Country Gospel.  Program:  "Good Morning Metroplex."  Notables:  Jack Davis, Paul Thomas Hughes.
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KXOL, Fort Worth.  Station established 4/2/1947.  Format:  Variety (1947-1950s,) Country (1950s-1956,) Top 40 (1956-5/1976,) Country (5/1976 to 11/23/1985.)  First fulltime 24-hour radio operation in Fort Worth.  First non-network affiliated station in Fort Worth, first area station to use block programming.  Owners:  Fort Worth Broadcasting Company (4/2/1947-?; headed by Frank M. Skinner and later Earle Fletcher,) C. C. Woodson (?-7/21/1955,) Wendell Mayes Sr. aka KXOL Inc. (7/21/1955-11/1/1973; Mayes also owned local Muzak franchise beginning in 4/1965 as "Music Broadcast Company," which fed generic music to area subscribers via FM sideband and telephone lines,) Tom E. Turner dba TETCO/Signal Oil/Sigmor (11/1/1973-11/23/85; officed in basement of station.)  Nickname:  "Pure Country."  Flagship station for Fort Worth Cats baseball.  Promotion:  "Adam," a personified, automated phone dialer that called listeners at random to guess a jackpot amount (1968.)  Programs:  "Hillbilly Supper Club," "The Coca Cola Hi-Fi Club," "Ballads by Brooks," "Voters Digest."  Notables:  Lan "Lanny" Roberts, Michael James Lucas aka Michael James, Russ Bloxom (1961-1967, later longtime anchor for WBAP-TV/KXAS-TV,) Bob Meadows, Dickie Rose, Bob Norman, Brenda Bell, Larry Shannon, Michael Selden, Dave Garland, Eddie Gale (1959,) Ron Selden (Michael Selden's cousin,) Jim Lowe (1947-1950; helped put KXOL on the air,) Elston Brooks (host of "Ballads by Brooks;" later an entertainment columnist for the "Fort Worth Star-Telegram,") Jerry Hahn, Bill Hightower (1955-1958; ND who hired Bob Schieffer, Bruce Neal and Roy Eaton,) Norman Alden (later an actor; on-air role as "Epod", which is "dope" spelled backwards!  Alden was the first voice ever heard on KXOL,) Joe Wills, Brad Wilson, Suzanne Calvin (1976-1977,) Kent Burkhart (currently developing satellite technology in Florida,) Ken Krazon, Parker Willson, Robert Mitchell, Dick Yaws, Jim "Tuck" Tucker (who headed the listener's club, "Tucker's Commandoes;" also known as "Emperor Jim Tucker,") Chuck Murphy (to 1968,) Chuck Browning, Larry Vance, Misty Fincher aka "Frontier Lady," Davey O'Donnell (original host of "The Coca Cola Hi-Fi Club,") Bill Enis, John Puff aka John Lewis (who did final signoff of station in 1985; returned as host of a new "Hi-Fi Club" at KMNY-1360 in 2006,) Kenny Sargent (former singer with the Glen Gray Casa Loma Orchestra,) Bob Bruton (first overnight disc jockey in Fort Worth,) Bob Allen, Ben Laurie, Doug Helton, George Carlin (7/1959-2/1960; later a stand-up comedian; hosted "The Coca Cola Hi-Fi Club" and its successor, "The Teen Club,") Roy Eaton (ND, left KXOL for WBAP-TV, then returned to KXOL on 9/1/1968 as "Director of Informational Services,") Jim Ridgeway, Jim Robe, Dick Smith, Jim Travis, Jody Dean (9/1980-6/1981,) Joe Holstead, Joe Martin, "Texas" Joe Poovey aka "Groovey" Joe Poovey, John Paul Beard, Karen "Duckie" Fielding, Kay Patrick Powell, Ken "Hubcap" Carter, Larry Fitzgerald, Neil Baird (1953-1955; ND,) Bruce Neal, Bob Schieffer (later WBAP-TV anchor and host of CBS' "Face the Nation,") Dennis Bruton, Chuck Dunaway, Jim MacKrell aka Jimmy Kaye (later game show host, actor and infomercial spokesman,) Bob Botick, Mac Hudson, Bill Hix (first airborne traffic reporter in DFW; flew in a Piper Cub!,) Frank Jolle, Anne Crawford, Mac Curtis (currently heads a rockabilly musical act; spent time at KFI-Los Angeles in the 1970s,) Bill Brooks, Bill "Sweet William" Herring, Larry Glenn, Larry Morrell, Lou Staples, Marcos Rodriguez, "Captain" Mike Ambrose (to KXOL, then KLIF-1190, then to LA radio thereafter; then spent over 25 years as San Diego weatherman,) Mike Kelly, Mike Parenti aka Mike Monday, Morgan Choat, Bill Howell.

Also Bill Smith aka Bill Mack (II), Norman Hall, Harry "Paxton" Mills, Phil Robbins, Jim Rose (MD,) Ray Robbin, Ruben T. "Mad Lad" Washington, Rocky Davis, Bill Noble, Bob Richmond, Carl Story, Harold Hodo aka Casey Jones, Cris Taylor (as host of "Voters Digest,") Cecil Knight (spent 20 years as airborne traffic reporter for KPRC-TV Houston; later with WBAP in 2003-04,) Charlie Pro, Chem Terry, "Cowboy" Weaver, Dave Ambrose, Gene Kelly, Ron Peterson, Ron Stevens, Ron McCoy, Dave Dumas, David Coursey, Johnny May, Don Day, Jerry Condra aka Jerry Parks (not the same as WFAA-TV's Jerry Park,) Jerry Park aka Sid Park (who IS the WFAA-TV anchor; Condra liked the name "Park" better; Park deferred and took the name "Sid Park."  Don Hodges, Warren Webber aka Bill Warren, Zack Hurt, Ronnie Voss, Roy Stamps, Rusty Reynolds, Skeeter Gordon, Tom Meade aka Rod Tanner, Jerry Lee (1960,) Steve Rich, Ken Ratliff, Jim Ratliff (1975-77,) Stew Robb, Tom Green, Lowell "Jay" Duncan, Rod Roddy (began 1957; later announcer for CBS' "The Price is Right,") Gary Wayne, Dick Osburn (VP/GM, late 1960s,) Misty Fincher aka "The Frontier Gal," Breck Harris (later WBAP-TV reporter,) Randy "Red Rocket" Hames, Ron Spain, Doug Adams (later GM for KXAS-TV,) David Jarrott (as host of the "Jack and Jarrott Morning Show," 1969-71,) Bruce Buchanan aka Jim Edwards, Gary Dark, Leo Burch, Gary Stone, Gene Ashcraft aka Gene Craft (developed the Dallas Cowboys Radio Network in 1965,) George Wiley, Ron McCoy, Hal King, Scott Reese (began 5/1976; worked concurrently at KDNT during mid-1976,) Rocky Davis, George Erwin, Jack Burns (1959-60; comedian partnered with George Carlin; later of duo "Burns and Schreiber;" Avery Schreiber is the late moustached Doritos spokesman in the 1970s,) Jack Monroe, Jack Murray, Jason Walker, Tom Wayne, Jay Langhammer, Mark Johns aka Mark "Brother" Shane (1969-1970,) Charles Wallace, Jerry May, Mike O'Hare, Tommy Vance, Ken Enos aka Ken Knight, Tony Berta, Jeff Yates, Jim "Shootin'" Newton, Bill Beasley, Bob Beattie, "Big" Tom Bigby, Don Sitton aka Don Miller, Dick Bove, Johnny Bridges, John Burns, Robert Crouse, Hal Eisner, Jeff Cunningham (1977,) Earle Fletcher (began 1/1952,) Charles and Joyce Hobby, D. C. Hornburg, Herb Humphries, Rick Johnson aka Bwana Johnny, Russ Lamb, Steve Lewis, Charles Mahan, Charlie Martin, John McCarty (1979-1982,) Nick Brounoff aka Nick Alexander (1974,) Danny Moffat, Charles Murphy (best known as WBAP-TV anchor during the JFK Assassination coverage,) Barney Pip, William Rice, Art Riley, John Rook, Frank M. Skinner, Charles Watson, Joe Willis.  Also, Larry and Jody Huchingson volunteered time at the station in the 1950s.  When KXOL was sold in 1985, many employees defected to KPAR-Granbury.   The oldies music collection was auctioned off to KLUV, who used it to bolster their oldies format.  Station first located at 1216 Pennsylvania at Henderson in downtown Fort Worth, to 3004 W. Lancaster in 9/1965, and to West 7th Street thereafter.
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE
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1370

KFJZ, Fort Worth.  Station established 1924 (other sources say 9/1923) at 1180 kc, but roots of station date back to 1917.  Format:  Variety/ Entertaiment.  Owners:  US Government (1917-1918,) W. E. "Bill" Branch (1918-1924?; 1924-1928,) H. C. Allison (1928-1930,) H. C. Meacham (1930-1931,) Ralph Bishop (1931-1938,) Elliot and Ruth Roosevelt dba Fort Worth Broadcasters (1938-1945.)  The original KFJZ began as a 5-watt military communications station for Fort Worth's Camp Bowie during World War I in 1917.  After Armistice Day on 11/11/1918, W. E. "Bill" Branch, an electronics tinkerer near Fort Worth, was offered any radio equipment he wanted from the disbanded military camp.  By 1920, the original equipment had been reconstructed in Branch's living room, and the station was back on the air.  Around 1923-24, Branch sold the equipment to the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary for $500 so they could start their own station.  However, SBTS couldn't afford to keep it on or to do the maintenance, so Branch was given back the equipment for free, provided he'd haul it all away.  Branch had relocated closer to town to the Polytechnic area in 1924, and again set up the station studios and transmitter in his house and backyard (other sources say he set up studios at the Northern Texas Traction Company at 3rd and Main, downtown.)  This time, he operated KFJZ as a commercial station (other sources say it became commercial in 1926,) increased the power to 50 watts, and broadcasted for two to three hours a day.  Moved to 1140 kc in 1925, and to 1200 kc in 1927.

On 1/12/1928, Branch sold the station to H. C. Allison for $9,000, and increased the power to 100 watts at the time of sale.  Allison relocated the studios to the Moore Building at 10th and Main in downtown Fort Worth, aired programming from 8PM-10PM nightly, and hired Truett Kimzey as chief engineer.  Kimzey rebuilt the transmitter and increased the power to 250 watts.  Allison soon moved the station south of town to the Sunnyhill Dairy Farm area.  By mid-1928, Allison relinquished programming control by setting up an LMA for "The Texas Hour," headed by George Gleeson.  On 11/11/1928, all stations in the US were assigned frequencies by the Federal Radio Commission, and KFJZ was awarded 1370 kc (other sources say it was at 1360 until 1930.)  In 1929, Allison terminated the LMA and reassumed control of the station.  In 1930, he sold it to Fort Worth pioneer H. C. Meacham for $19,000, and Meacham moved the studios to the mezzanine level of his Meacham's Department Store at 12th and Main, downtown.  Store patrons were treated to live musical acts as they performed for the station; the Light Crust Doughboys (featuring Bob Wills) got their start this way.  In 1931, the station was sold again, this time to Ralph S. Bishop for $39,000 (some sources say $32,000) and the studios were relocated to the Texas Hotel (into the same studios where KTAT had recently moved from) and later to the Trinity Life Building.  During this time, KFJZ expanded to an 18-hour broadcast day.  Bishop held the station for six years, selling it on 4/14/1938 (other sources say June, 1937) to Fort Worth Broadcasters, headed by Ruth and Elliott Roosevelt (son of FDR) for $57,000.  By September, 1938, the Roosevelts constructed new studios for KFJZ at 1201 W. Lancaster St. and created the Texas State Network.  TSN was chartered on 8/2/1938, and its premiere broadcast was from a Casa Manana event on 9/15/1938.  (KFJZ had been a Mutual affiliate previously, and became the flagship for TSN.)  On 8/16/1939, the Roosevelts purchased KTAT-1240 for $101,570 and moved KFJZ there, and surrendered their license for the 1370 frequency.  See entry at 1270.

Thanks to Bill Fairlie (FW Star-Telegram,) Richard Schroeder and the Fort Worth Public Library's clipping file for much of the above information.


1380

WPSK562, Royse City.  Low-power station broadcasting Royse City municipal information.


1390
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KBEC, Waxahachie.  Station established 6/26/1955.  Format:  Country (12/1988-present,) Standards (?-12/1988,) Spanish (1978,) Big Band (1978.)  Call letters stand for "Keep Building Ellis County."  Owner:  Richard Tuck (longest continuous owner of a Texas radio station; owned station KBBA-AM in Bentonville, AR when he applied for KBEC.)  Sister station to KBEC-FM.  Programs:  "Italy [High School] Hour," "1390 Club" (both hosted by Bill Ward, who began with the station on its premiere date,) "Sunday Morning Polka Show" (1964-present,) "Quest," "Coffee Cup Hour" (1955-2002; longest running morning program in DFW area.)  Notables:  Bill Ward (began 6/26/1955,) John Borders aka Johnny Dark (1956,) Morgan Choat, Catherine Crandall, Roger Creech, Mike Crow, Victor Donovan, Richard Tuck (station owner and host of "Coffee Cup Hour,") Bob Easley, Lee Harris, Vicki Harris, Doug Harrison, Chris Huff, Gene Kelly, Pat McDonald, Jonathan Hayes, Gary Barton, Barry Wolverton, Nolan Moran the "3-D Man", Jerry Lee (1955,) Mike O'Daniel, Faye Tuck aka "Miss Faye" (wife of Richard Tuck,) Sam Meyers, "Shootin'" Jim Newton, T. K. Wheeler, Mark Pannill, Harold Patton, Cecil Burton (sports director, 1955-57,) "Ranger Rita," Rex Reese, W. C. Estes Jr. (as host of "Quest,") Jeremy Robinson, "Ramblin'" Roy Miller, Mike Turner, Jerry West, Wes Wilson, Ken Roberts, Dub Estes, Carroll Todd, Johnny Krajda (host of "Sunday Morning Polka Show.")

KWHA, Waxahachie.  CP issued in 1952; deleted in 1953.  Owner:  Cen-Tex Broadcasting.  Calls to have stood for Waxahachie.  Notable:  Pierce Brooks.

KELL, Waxahachie.  CP issued in 1949, deleted in 1951.  Calls to have stood for Ellis County.

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1400
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KGVL, Greenville.  Station established 3/27/1946, but began construction in 1941 (delayed by World War II-related shortage of copper and equipment.)  Format:  Classic Country (8/15/2009-present,) News/Talk/Sports (to 8/15/2009,) Oldies (began 5/1999,) Country (1/1994-5/1999,) News/Talk (?-1/1994,) Adult Contemporary (2/1987-?,) Standards (?-2/1987.)  Owner:  Truett Kimzey (who also contracted out his engineering services concurrently to KFJZ-AM, and operated a TV repair service in Fort Worth,) Leo Hackney dba First Greenville Corporation, Susquehanna/Cumulus (who bought KGVL along with KIKT-FM in 1996, strictly to downgrade the FM's power to move Susquehanna's KKZN-93.3 into DFW,) Alpha and Mike Horne (6/19/2009-present; bought both KGVL and sister KIKT-FM for $600,000.)  Broadcasts in AM Stereo.  Sister station to KIKT-FM.  Nicknames:  "Home Town Radio," "14K Oldies."  Call letters stand for Greenville. Network affiliations:  MBS, KBS, TSN, AP.  First broadcasted with 500 watts, then to 1,000 watts in 2/1965.   Programs:  "Luncheon Lyrics," "Sports Hi Lites," "The Lion's Roar," "Lake Country Jubilee," "Rhythm Roundup," "Sunrise Jamboree," Rhythm Rodeo," "Musical Clock," "Western Hits."  Notables:  Frank Janda (longtime SM; operated station under an LMA as "Dynamic Broadcasting LLC" from 1999 to 7/15/2006 along with Sandra Salley; owner Cumulus had Janda arrested in 2006 over false pretenses regarding Janda's non-sharing of advertising revenue; Cumulus settled the countersuit in 9/2008,) Dave Garland, Dave Mitchell, "Gentleman" Jim Carter, Pete Stein, Rich Reneau, J. Mary Jones, Ralph Marcom, Harold Marshall (host of "Lake Country Jubilee,") Earle Fletcher (original GM, late of KFJZ-AM,) Charlie Payne, Leo Hackney (succeeded Fletcher as GM in 5/1947,) Porter Randall (via TSN,) Chuck Shamka, Cedric Foster (via MBS,) Charles Joslin (GM,) John Butler.  Once had CP to move to 1200 kc as a daytime-only station.  Station first located in Greenville, then to 1517 Wolfe City Drive in 7/1973.
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1420

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KPIR, Granbury.  Call letters established 6/6/2002.  Format:  Country.  Nickname:  "The Pirate," "Your Hometown Station," "News and Sports of Hood County."  Owner:  BBC Broadcasting, Pirate Broadcasters.  Notables:  Dick Siegel, Shayne Hollinger, Lee Riza (PD,) Skip Young, "Granny Granbury," John Beard, Bill Coward, Buddy Hodges, Byron Anderson, Sylvia Dalton, Robert Elliott, Scott Randolph.  Daytime only station.

KPAR, Granbury.  Station established 2/27/1980.  Format:  Country.  Nicknames:  "Lake Country Radio," "Pure Country" (re-used from KXOL.)  Owner:  James and Fran Parr, Gary Luker dba Granbury Broadcasting, BBC Broadcasting.  Network:  TSN.  Notables:  John Puff aka John Lewis, Charlie Martin, Tom Wayne, Joe Martin, Bill Smith aka Bill Mack (II), Ronny Voss, Steve Rich (all of whom defected from KXOL-1360 when the station was sold in 1985,) Jody Dean, Pamela Steele, Don Swancy (10/1987-7/1988.)  Station was under constant financial difficulties, later resulting in their news and weather teletypes being repossessed!  Also lost was the affiliation with TSN, but station rigged a receiver to intercept the TSN newscasts anyway.  Initially a 24-hour operation; reduced to daytime-only in 1986.

And separately, serving the Bonham market:

KFYN, Bonham.  Station established 5/25/1948.  Unknown format.  Owner: Vision Media Group, Frank Svoboda (1948-?,) Charles Cain.

1440
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KTNO, Denton/University Park.  Call letters established 7/11/1997.  Format:  Spanish Christian.  Call letters derived from "Latino."  Owner:  Mortenson Broadcasting.  Nickname:  "Radio Vida."  Notables:  Jose Castillo, Josue A. Rodriguez, Rafael Hernadez, Eusebio Balderas, German Guevara, Reynaldo Perez, Kenia Beltran, Erika Garcia, Angel Pincay, Jesus Saldaña.  Simulcasted to KNAX-1630, 3/20/2001-7/2002.  Station licensed to Denton until 2002.  New towers installed on Bruton Road at Second Avenue in 2005.
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KINF, Denton.  Call letters established 3/15/1996.  Format:  Spanish talk (informacion.)
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KICI, Denton.  Call letters established 3/15/1994.  Format:  Spanish Country (began under KDNT calls on 12/1/1993.)  Sister station to KLTY-FM.  Former sister station to KICI-FM.  Owner:  Rodriguez Broadcasting.  Notable:  Betty Whatley (5/24/1994-1/1999; wife of KDNT's Hal Whatley.)  Simulcasted KAND-FM starting in 12/1993.  Station located at 1440 Wheeler Dr in Denton.
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KDNT, Denton.  Station established 6/1/1938.  Format:  Spanish Country (12/1/1993-3/15/1994,) News/Talk (10/1989-12/1/1993; plus a lone broadcast on 12/9/1993,) SMN "Country Gold" format via satellite (1987-10/1989,) Easy Listening (to 1987.) Sister station to KDNT-FM/KZRK-FM (106.1, 1949-1970s; then 94.5, 1983-89) and was to be sister to proposed TV station KDNT-Channel 2.  Station began life at 1420 kHz, moved to 1450 kHz in 1940, and to 1440 kHz in 1942.  Call letters stood for Denton. Owners:  Harwell V. Shepard (1947-1972,) Bass Brothers (1972-10/1976; Bass Brothers later formed Anchor Media, who owned KZEW/KKWM/WFAA in the late 1980s,) Mel Wheeler (10/1976-11/17/1984,) Galen O. Gilbert and Associates dba KDNT Radio Inc. aka Community Service Radio Group (11/17/1984-1993, although FM side was sold in 1989,) Rodriguez Broadcasting (12/1/1993 through format/call letter change in 3/1994; paid $650,000 for it.)  Promotion:  "Shout That Slogan."  Programs: "The Dawn Patrol," "Good Morning North Texas," "Noon News Watch," "Swap Shop," "The Alan Crone Talk Show," "Of, For & About Women," "The Clyde Sebastian Show," "1440 Club," "Night Notes," "Legal Talk," "The Richard Pitzinger Show" (featuring the Western Melody Makers band, headed by Sid King,) "Saturday Night Hoedown," "Saturday Night Stage Show," "First United Methodist Church" (KDNT broadcasted their services for over 50 years!), "Deborah Norville Show" (via satellite, 1991.)  Notables:  Sam Sauls, Roger Emrich, Mike Ehrle aka Mike Ward (1964-1973,) Ken Rench (1959-1968,) Sandy Shepard aka Clyde Sebastian aka James Lewis (Sandy was the son of owner Harwell Shepard,) Bill Orton, Hal Whatley (1960-1993; Chief Engineer; also hosted radio program briefly as "Country Cuz,") Jess Gilbert (CE, 1993,) Andy Shane, Buford Harrell (1951-1985,) Josh Holstead (1985,) Brian Gann, Mike Shannon (II) (1988,) Carl Martin, Chris Anderson aka Dave Christian, Richard Pitzinger, Charlie Beard, Lee "Woody" Woodward (1954-1955; brother of actor Morgan Woodward,) Willie Nelson (yes, the singer!  Disc jockey during 1954), Ross Ramsey, Russ Campbell, Doyle King (4/1978-12/30/1980,) George Krieger (1983-1984,) Tom Light (1941-1944; later owned Tom Light Chevrolet in Bryan, TX,) Bill Smith aka Bill Mack, Mike Magruder, Michael Main, Prince Mayne, Matt McClennahan aka Matt Reese, Jerry McNatt, George Nolen, Vivian Badillo Cullipher, Tim Sullivan, Dave Hunt, Sheryl Powers, Ellise Pierce, Jim McShan, Bill Mercer (1959-1976; 1984-1993,) Marshall Bill Moyers (mid-1950s,) Jim "Shootin'" Newton, Chris Ontego aka Chris Wayne, Jim Palmer, Polly Plummer, Bob Powell, Pat Reeded, Walter Richardson, Ellen Sanko, Anne Schulze, Lorie Sheffield (ND, 1977-1978,) "Red" Shepard (first wife of owner Harwell Shepard,) Bill Roy Switzer, Bill Van Ness, Philip Walker (1940s,) Jack Wallace (1930s,) Casey Walston (1980s,) Jay Ward (ND, 1970s,) Vinny Ryan Wheeler (wife of owner Mel Wheeler,) Davie Lee White aka Davie Lee, Sam Whitmire (currently with KFWR-FM in Fort Worth; married to radio personality Debi Diaz,) Ray Whitworth, Farris Wilson (1938,) Patrick Woods, Dave Wright.

Also Bruce Michaels (OM in 1991,) Colonel Mason, Mark Followill, Alan Crone (to 1993; host of the "Alan Crone Talk Show;" currently with KOTV-Tulsa as staff meteorologist,) Bill Van Ness, Joe Fuchs aka Con West/Jay Weaver (1965,) Ray Weathers, Dean Minnick (GM,) Micky Murphy (c. 1930s,) Frank Haley (1961,) Joe Dodd (1991-1993,) Mel Cummings (1961,) Dave Mitchell (1968-1972,) Doug Anderson, Mike Robinson (1981-1982,) "Boppin'" Bob Berry, Steve "Dusty" Rhodes, Kim Landrum, Dennis Grandcolas (1986-1993,) Harley Balew, Sid Erwin aka Sid King, Mary Grace Smith, Scott Sommer (PD, 1980s,) Michael Rey (II), Kenny Sargent, Andy Waldrop, George Gimarc, Earl Rast, Bob Bostian (began 1972,) Hal Thompson, Virgie Burrows, Aubrey Jackson, Jim Boso, Harry Dierks, Ken McClure aka Ken Knox, Clark Wheeler (GM,) Steve Wheeler (both sons of owner Mel Wheeler,) Dusty Hendrix, Bernie Tamayo (later a WBAP-TV news anchor,) Scott Causey aka Dave Scott, Terry Starnes aka Terry Wayne, Dale Olson (1984-1993,) Hal Murray, Kathy Machi, Jeff Lyons, Joe Short (GM, 1984-1986,) Larry Crippen aka Johnny Flash/Larry Lee, Herman Cecil, Bob Syler, Scott Reese (as Charlie Tuna; Reese was concurrently on KXOL in mid-1976,) Doug Adams (later ND at KXAS-TV,) Stephen Albrecht (1969-1972,) Bobby Allen (to 1993,) D. J. Anderson (to 1993,) Brent Baker, LaCola Hanks Barlow, Frank Barrow (1938-1939; later mayor of Denton,) Jeffery Bennett (PD; started 1985,) Dave Buell, Cody Burk, Rick Burt aka Rick Burton, Dan Clark (pre-1960,) Warren Clary, Dave Cooley, Tom Crouch (early 1980s,) Roger Daniel (ND; 12/1973-1975,) Bruce Davis (1955,) Ted Davis (now play-by-play announcer with Milwaukee Bucks basketball,) B. H. Dennison (CE, 1939-1940,) Sally Diamond, George Dunham (1984-1988; currently with KTCK-1310,) Brule Eagan (1988-1990,) Eddie Evans (1952-1953,) Matt Freeman (1991,) Bob Dunn, Larry Weinstein, Dave Garland (sales; began 1975,) Bill George (pre-1960,) Fred Graham, Vernon Hartman, G. C. Hollowwa (CE; 1940-1941,) Brooks Holt (1953-1962,) Bill Honeycutt (CE, 1938; later longtime CE for KRLD-TV,) Irv Jackson aka Jack Bishop, Kit King, Stan King, Grant Koeller (1983.)  KDNT-AM is perhaps the only case ever where a station briefly reverted to its old format and personalities after a sale has been completed and a new format implemented... former owner Galen Gilbert worked out a post-sale plan to bring back "The Alan Crone Talk Show" for one final airing, despite the new ownership and Spanish Country format that had already been in place for a week!  Gilbert felt that it was important to the community to have a forum to discuss pending Denton school district legislation.  Power increase from 100 watts to 250 watts in 1945, with subsequent upgrades over the years to 1,000, and 5,000.  Station located at 235 West Hickory in Denton (1947-79) and 1440 Wheeler St, south of Denton (1979-93; building and towers razed in 10/2005.)

Mike Ehrle and company chronicle the history of KDNT...click here!


1450

Unnamed, Commerce.  CP issued on 9/2/1953, but station never signed on.  Owner:  W. W. Mangum dba Memorial Broadcasting.  KDNT owner Harwell Shepard immediately filed a protest with the FCC, arguing that this proposed station would interfere with his at nearby 1440.  The FCC agreed, and canceled Memorial's application on 8/31/1955.


1460
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KCLE, Burleson.  Call letters re-established 9/1/2008 (from 1140; KHFX calls were exchanged there.)   Format:  FOX Sports, Country (as "Big Country;" began 12?/2008.)

KHFX, Burleson.  Call letters established 11/1/2005.   Format:  FOX Sports (moved from KFCD-990.)  Flagship of Fort Worth Brahmas hockey.  Owner:  M&M Broadcasters.  Notable:  Jim Rome.

KTFW, Glen Rose.  Station established 2/19/2002.  Format:  Classic Country.  Owner:  M&M Broadcasters (80%,) George Marti (20%.)  Simulcast from sister station KTFW-92.1 FM.  Notables: Morgan Choat, Joy Delaney, Ron Peterson, Jimmy Aiken, Dave Stone, Mike Crow, Gary Moss, Scott Miller, Ron Moore, Marlee Padgett, Richard Adams, Jamie McGriff, Jimmy Stewart, Bill Jackson, Jim Russell.

KKTK, Glen Rose.  Call letters established 6/24/1996.

WACO, Waco.  Station established 7/22/1922.  Owner:  Lee Glasgow.  Former sister station to WACO/KHOO-FM.  Moved COL to Glen Rose in 1996.  Notable:  Eddie Craig.


1480
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KNIT, Dallas.  Call letters established 3/30/2005.  Format:  Southern Gospel, ESPN Deportes (began 6/25/2007.)  Nicknames:  "Your Home for Southern Gospel Music," "KNIT, Southern Gospel 1480."  Owner:  James Crystal Florida Inc. (11/1/2005-present; traded WORL-Orlando for KNIT,) Salem (3/2005-11/1/2005; Salem's board includes VP Ken Scott Gaines, who was once the PD for 1480's KBOX in the 1960s.)  Network affiliation:  SRN (Salem,) ESPN Deportes (Spanish sports.)

KHCK, Dallas.  Call letters established 6/18/2002.  Format:  Spanish (Tejano.)  Owner:  Univision.  Call letters stood for "Kick."  Simulcast of sister station KHCK-FM (8/2002-4/20/2004; continued alone with Tejano format and FM's personalities after FM switched to Cumbia format.)  Notables:  Pancho Pistolas (jock and PD,) Jonny Ramirez, "Big Poppa," Stephanie Marie.

KDXX, Dallas.  Call letters established 2/20/1998.  Format:  Spanish.  Nickname:  "Amor."  Sister station to KDOS-FM.

KMRT, Dallas.  Call letters established 4/1/1993.  Format:  Spanish (Banda.)  Call letters stood for "K-Mart;" although not affiliated with the retail chain, it was to imply to advertisers that the station was a 'great value.'  Owner:  Marcos Rodriguez.
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KCMZ, Dallas.  Call letters established 9/4/1991.  Format:  Easy Listening via Unistar Network.  Nickname:  "Memories 1480."  Owner:  Granum.  Notable:  Frank Gonzales.  Sister station to KCDU-FM (formerly KMEZ-FM.)
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KDBN, Dallas. Call letters established 9/21/1989.  Format:  Dallas Business News.  Owner:  Granum (6/1991 to format change,) Gillmore (to 6/1991.)  Broadcasted SMU football games.  Sister station to KMEZ-FM.  Programs:  "America's Dining and Travel Guide," "Dialogue," "Talkin' with Pauken" (hosted by Congressman Tom Pauken.)  Notable:  John Butler.  The KDBN calls were resurrected locally by 93.3-"The Bone" in 2002.
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KMEZ, Dallas.  Call letters established 11/15/1982.  Format:  Easy ("EZ") Listening.  Owner:  DKM-Dallas Broadcasting Corp. (11/1/1986-1988,) Gillmore (1988-3/1991.)  Simulcast of sister station KMEZ-FM.  See KMEZ-FM for list of personalities.  KMEZ moved from their original KBOX studios to 5956 Sherry Lane, Dallas, in 8/1989.  Flagship for SMU football (1989.)
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KBOX, Dallas.  Call letters established 7/14/1958.  Format:  Top 40 (7/14/1958-1/24/1967,) Country (1/24/1967-11/14/1982.)  Owners:  Balaban (7/14/1958-8/1/1967,) Group One Broadcasting (8/1/1967-1986.)  Nicknames:  "Wonderful K-BOX," "Big Top Radio."  Sister station of KBOX-FM/KTLC-FM.  Named for Balaban VP John Box.  Programs:  "Ask Tex Schramm" (began in early 1960s and later moved to KRLD,) "Feminist View," "Amigo Forum," "In Black America," "Black History," "Spectrum," "Dallas Dialog," "Youth and Their Community," "Energy and You," "Lawn and Garden," "Myers Showcase," "Science of the Mind," "Chuck Howley Show" (Howley was a Dallas Cowboys player,) "Man and his Environment." Notables as "Top 40":  Ron Jenkins aka Ron McAlister, Bob Dayton, Pat Hughes (1960-61,) Brad Wilson, Dan Ingram (1959-61; spent 40 years in New York radio,) Frank Jolle (1/4/1965-12/30/1966,) Gary Mack, Rex Miller, Danny Patrick McCurdy aka Dan Patrick, Frank Glieber (hosted "Ask Tex Schramm" [Schramm was GM of the Dallas Cowboys,]) Roger Barkley (spent 18 years at Los Angeles' KFI,) Ken McClure aka Ken Knox, Jerry Clemmons, Joe Long, Mike Terry, Tex DeWeese, Al Smith, Dave Tucker, Jerry Knight, Dan Casey, Terry Byrd, "Emporer" Bill Ward  (1964-71; jock, PD and later SM; spearheaded the move from Top 40 to Country in 1967,) Bill Holley, Ben Laurie, Bobby Brock (not the same as the former Times Herald TV columnist,) Johnny McKinney, Jack Schell aka Jack West (Schell broadcasted nightly from a local bowling alley, Circle Bowl,) Chuck Benson, Chuck Dunaway, Gary West, Jerry Goodwin aka Danny Preston, Al Lohman, Hal Raymond, Johnny Borders, Tony deHaro (1960s; cousin of Anna deHaro, current KDMX personality,) Bill Mackey (began 1961,) Ray Carnay, Irene Runnels, Glen Sims, Jack Carney, Bill Jenkins, Paul Potter, Phil Allen, Robb Robbins, Dick Clayton, Bob Whitney, John Box, Dick Morrison, Harriet Baker, Charles Boland, Gordon Vaughn, Pat Conway, Jim MacKrell aka Jimmy Kaye (later game show host, actor and infomercial spokesman,) Eddie Gale (1958,) Edward Hunt, Lloyd George, Harry Hines, Joseph Wolfman, Earl Bodine, Charlie Van Dyke (who served as an intern at the station as a teen; hosted an occasional feature on high school happenings; trademark voice was a result of rheumatic fever that scarred his vocal cords at age 13,) Parker Daggett, Stanton Pearson, Bob Davis (1969-76,) Tom Murphy, Pat Harrington, George "Super" Cooper, Ken Dowe, Jack O'Day, Frank Malone, Jerry Kunkel, Sam Pate, Allen Abbott, Kay Box, Mike Marshall (1960,) Ceryl McDonald, Karl King, Jack Dillon, Dan Hydrick, Betty Verrell, Don Buehler.

Also Charlie Van ("The Moving Man,") Ken Gaines aka Ken "Great" Scott (currently a VP with Salem; Salem bought KNIT-1480 in 2005,) Stu Hepburn (Sales Manager; worked concurrently for KNOK,) Edward "Ned" Sheridan Jr (ND,) Chuck Kirk, Alan Golden, Robert Swortwood, Joe McChesney aka J. Morgan Van Buren (later with KXXK-FM as PD,) William Wentzell, Khan Hamon, Hyman Childs (currently owner of KKDA AM/FM and KRNB-FM,) Robert Hanna, Bill Hampton, Leo Letterer, Bill Thompson.  Notables as "Country": Allan Peck and Peggy Newman aka Peggy Sears (the "Peck and Peggy Show", 1976-80,) Allan Peck and Penny Reeves (the "Peck and Penny Show," 1974-76; Peck currently DJs on KHYI-FM, and owns a home theatre business; son Allan Peck II is a DJ on 96.7-The Twister,) Bobby Dark, Ron Rice (I), Jack Weston (later president of RCA Records in Nashville,) Danny McDuff (1977-80; left for KPLX-FM,) Jim Rose (1971-72,) Len Mohnkern (final broadcaster before 11/14/1982 signoff,) Roger Dimick (1970,) Larry Whiteside, Doug Helton, Russ Campbell, Davie White aka Davie Lee (1967-68,)Dick Moore (host of "Spectrum," replaced by Dave O'Brien,) Lorna Littleway, Larry Scott, Dick Wheeler, Ross Ramsey, Gail Lightfoot, Tim Kase, Tom Matts, Alan Holmes, Dave Manders (sales; former Dallas Cowboys player and father of current country singer Mark David Manders,) Bob Marion (host of "In Black America,") Bill Anderson (host of "Man and his Environment,") Joe Greer, Bob Clayton, Jack Gardiner, Art Keller (began 7/1967,) Dan Dailey (began 7/1967,) Allan King, Larry Scott, Bob Bostian (GM; left in 1972 for a Denver station, but returned to the area at KDNT later that year,) Roger Berk, Dave Malone, "Emmett," Sherman Cohen (who filed a discrimination suit against the station in 1971,) Russel Lee Moore aka Russ "Weird Beard" Knight (1971,) Ted Roney, George Pechancek, Don Wade, Jay Ward, Jason Walker, Mac Daniels, Jim Rohnes, Darcel Barnes, David Hultsman, Patricia Smith-Melton (1979-1980,) Earl Vandervoort, Craig Magee (PD in 1976,) Loren Wilhelm aka Dave O'Brien (as host of "Spectrum," "Dallas Dialog," "Youth and Their Community," "Lawn and Garden" and "Energy and You,") Rick Fulgham, Ken Loomis, Chester "Chet" Maxwell (12/1969-11/1986,) Tom Lundgren aka "Tiger" Tom Allen, Donald Curtis (host of "Science of the Mind.")  Station located at 9900 McCree Road in Dallas (1958-1982.)
AIRCHECK AVAILABLE

Mike Ehrle and company chronicle the history of KBOX and KGKO...click here!
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KGKO, Dallas.  Station established 1/25/1953.  Format:  Adult Standards, Jazz.  Owner:  Lakewood Broadcasting.  Not related to the original KGKO at 570 kc.  To have been sister station to proposed KDTX-TV Channel 23.  Programs:  "Go to Town," "Morning Grinder Show," "The Nightwatchman Show," "Bandstand."  Notables:  Tony Davis, Buddy Harris (as host of the "Morning Grinder Show,") Tex DeWeese, Harvey Matusow, Don Keyes (1953-57; his first job in radio; went to KLIF-AM thereafter and had a long, distinguised career with the McLendon organization,) Leonard Coe, Sam Bennett, John Knapp, Marvin Williams, Jimmy Harris, Ed Jordan, Carmine Anthony, Clem Cooper, Bill Borum (as host of the "Nightwatchman Show,") Bud Vincent, Gary Wood, "Gene."  Station located at 9900 McCree Road, Dallas (1956-1958,) and at the Cliff Towers Hotel (1952-1956; former home to KLIF-AM.)
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1500

KJIM, Sherman.  Call letters established 7/31/1991.  Format:  Oldies.  Owner:  "Bobbin'" Bob Allen (longtime DFW radio personality.)  Calls resurrected from KJIM-870.  Located near the Woodlawn Country Club (1968-present.) Daytime only station.

KTXO, Sherman.  Call letters established 1958.  Format:  Country and Western (one of the first Texas stations to go C&W.)  Calls stood for Texas and Oklahoma.  Owners:  King Fisher/Jimmy Fisher/Harry O'Conner/Paul Carter dba O'Conner Broadcasting (1958-60,) Bill Jaco and Tom Spellman (1960-69; Jaco was a disc jockey,) Floyd Shelton (1969-?,) Larry Henderson (co-owned with his wife.)  Notables:  David Sprowl, John Scott, Bill Jaco, Gary King.  Increased power to 1,000 watts in 1968.  Sister station to KWSM-FM.  Located on US 75, south of US 82, then to the Grayson Bank Building, then to near the Woodlawn Country Club (1968-present.)

KTAN, Sherman.  Station established 12/19/1947.  Format:  Entertainment, Classical.  Owners:  Joe Carroll and Elmer Scarborough (1947-48,) Tony Anthony and E. T. Fant Jr (1948-?,) Charles L. Cain (?-1953,) Col. Howard L. Burris (1953-55; operated under an LMA to Howard Davis,) Galen O. Gilbert (1955-57; Gilbert later owned KDNT-Denton,) J. Lou Groves (1957; Groves was a theater operator,) Senator William J. Samples (1957-58,) and King Fisher/Jimmy Fisher/Harry O'Conner dba O'Conner Broadcasting (1958.)  Programs:  "An Ear for Corn" (morning show,) "Concerts in Miniature" (hosted by Bill Jaco,)   Notables:  Bill Jaco (who was the first to broadcast on the station, and was PD,) Otis McKenzie, Bill Collins, Louise Cobbler, Sue Hill, Paul Phillips, Stafford E. Davis.  Located at 2024 N. US 75, south of US 82.

1540
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KZMP, University Park.  Call letters established 12/29/1997.  Format:  Spanish (as "El Gato," 12/2003-8/2004, simulcasted from sister station KTCY-104.9; was simulcasted from other sister station KZMP-101.7 ["Radio Tricolor"] to 12/2003; along the way, KTCY-FM and KZMP-FM swapped calls,) Spanish Religious (under LMA, 8/2004-1/2006,) "Radio Tricolor" (again, this time as simulcast of sister KZMP 104.9 (1/2006-2009;) ESPN Sports (in Spanish) (2009-present.)  Owner:  Z-Spanish Media, Entravision (bought 8/15/2000,) Lieberman (bought 11/3/2006.)  Licensed to Fort Worth until 2003.  Notables:  Scott Savage, Dean James.
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KPAD, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 6/6/1997.  Format:  Motivational (non-religious.)  Call letters stood for "Personal Achievement - Dallas."  Aired syndicated programming from the Personal Achievement Radio service.  Notables:  Anthony Robbins, Zig Ziglar, Leo Buscaglia (all by satellite,) Muriel Funches, Mark Lambert.

KTNO, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 2/8/1993.  Format:  Spanish.  Call letters derived from "Latino."
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KSGB, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 3/27/1989.  Format:  Religious. Owner:  Jack Stuart and Mary Gaines.
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KSVZ, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 1/25/1988.  Format:  Religious.  Nickname:  "K-Saves."
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KMIA, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 6/25/1985, but station didn't sign on until 9/1985.  Call letters stood for "Ministry in Action."  Format:  Spanish/Tropical/Caribbean (to 3/1/1986,) Black Religious with some Spanish Religious (2/17/1986-1/25/1988.)  Nickname:  "Faith 1540."  Owners:  Nelson Laberen, Command Broadcast Associates.  Notables:  Era Alberto Soto, Jose Castillo, Josey Podesta.
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KUQQ, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 1983.  Format:  Spanish.
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KTIA, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 7/1979.  Format:  Spanish.
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KMZK, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 12/1978 (calls were an acronym of sorts for "muzik.")  Format:  Beautiful Music.  Owner:  Co-owned by actor Jimmy Stewart and William Schuller dba Radio 15, Inc.  Nickname:  "Radio 15."  Notables:  Dave Mitchell, Mark Martick aka Mark Roberts, John B. Wells, John Rody, Jack Dillon, Steve Cromer, Clarice Merryweather, Pat Gradski.
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KRXV, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 3/3/1976.  Format:  All News (3/3/1976-9/5/1977,) "Bright, Beautiful Music" (9/5/1977-12/1978.)  Call letters derived from roman numerals (R=Radio, XV=15.)  Nickname:  "Radio 15".  Owner:  Co-owned by actor Jimmy Stewart (I) and Bill Schueler (Schueler also owned the Oklahoma News Network) dba Radio 15, Inc.  Network affiliation:  NBC News and Information Service.  Notables:  Dave Mitchell, James "Jim" Miklaszewski aka James Alan (currently Pentagon correspondent for NBC-TV,) Rob Milford aka Rob Williams, Elizabeth Schuller, Larry LaMottoe, Greg LaMottoe (Larry and Greg went to CNN thereafter,) Rick Wais, Hal Eisner, Bob Rayel, Dan Steffel, Norris Palmer, Larry Fitzgerald, Robert Allen, Peter Wellish aka "Dr. Gonzo" (Fitzgerald, Allen and Wellish left the station after the All News format ended on 9/5/1977.) When KBUY owner John B. Walton sold 1540 to Radio 15, he kept the KBUY calls and transferred them to his station in Amarillo.  Later, his station in Ruidosa, NM was given the calls KBUY-FM.  Station located at Seminary South shopping mall in Fort Worth.
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KBUY, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 1/1/1967.  Format:  Ethnic, Spanish (c. 1972,) 'Country Classical' (began 1/2/1967.)  Owner:  John B. Walton (bought 8/24/1966.)  Sister station to KBUY-FM (both KCUL-AM and FM were sold to John Walton and became KBUY-AM/FM.)  Format adjustment in 1967 was noted to be "an 'uptown' version of KCUL."  Network affiliation:  Mutual.  Program:  "Cowtown Hoedown" (carried over from KCUL.) Notables:  Jack Dillon, Joe Fuchs aka Jay Weaver,(1/1966-1972,) Thomas Shelby Brown aka Randy Ryder, Harroll Harbuck aka Hal Jay (began 1972,) Brad Wilson, Boxcar Willie, Ted Mack, James Schumacher, Larry Shannon aka Charlie Wise, David Perkins aka Charlie Brown (1967,) Skeeter Gordon, Gene Kelly (aka Jelly Belly Kelly or Chuck Roast; PD; later with KXOL and spent many years in San Antonio radio thereafter,) Ken Enos aka Ken Knight (left for San Antonio radio,) Wade Simms aka Cary Simms (later with WBAP-TV,) Ron Rice (II), Larry Glenn, Don Sitton aka Don Miller, Jerry Condra aka Jerry Parks (not the same as WFAA-TV's Jerry Park,) Lawton Williams (singer/songwriter,) Eddie Craig (began 1/25/1969; late of KPCN,) Tony Berta, Roy Lemons (SM 1966-1969,) Don Thompson (PD,) Eddie Steward, Bob White (original PD,) Bob Allen (PD,) Bud McKool aka Bob Gordon, Darrell Monroe, Don Swancy, Ron Peterson, Bill Smith aka Bill Mack (II) (PD; began 10/1967; had been with predecessor KCUL-AM,) Stacy Richardson (1972-1973,) Gary Smith (1967-1969,) Bo Powell (began 1/23/1969; defected from KPCN,) Virgil Dowell aka Mike Bradley, Larry Fitzgerald, Jay Langhammer (1971,) Tom Bigby (PD; in Philadelphia radio for many years thereafter.)  Broadcasted with 50Kw (day) and 5,000 watts (night.)  Station located at Seminary South shopping mall in Fort Worth.  When John Walton sold KBUY-AM, he retained the call letters and sent them to his Amarillo, TX station.
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KCUL, Fort Worth.  Station established 1949.  Format:  Variety (to mid-1950s,) Country (mid-1950s-1/1/1967; also had blocks of Spanish programming in 1958.)  Nickname:  "The Station of Distinction," "Big Radio KCUL," "#1 Gun for Country Fun," "Sweet Popular and Semi-Classical."  Owner:  East-West Broadcasting (to 2/12/1951; the station was named for investor A. B. Culbertson, but other sources mention a connection to FW optometrist L. H. Luck [Luck Optical,] and that "KCUL" is "luck" spelled backwards,) Dr. James Ulmer (2/12/1951-1955,) Kurt Meer dba Dalworth Broadcasting (1955-8/24/1966; Meer purchased KJIM-870 after selling KCUL,) John B. Walton (8/24/1966-into KBUY.)   Sister station to KCUL-FM.  First local station to program Country music 24 hours a day.  Programs:  "Cowtown Hoedown" (from The Majestic Theatre; hosted by "Uncle Hank" Craig; show continued on its own with Craig as host after KCUL dropped it;)  "Homemaker's Holiday," "Ladies...Pat Patterson," "Open Line," "Guiding Lines" (fishing show,) "Mexico Lindo," "Women's Wisdom," "The Lunch Munchers Show," "Teen Club," "Cotton Pickers," "Life Line" (religious program funded by Dallas millionaire H. L. Hunt,) "Man on the Beat," and religious programs hosted by Garner Ted Armstrong and Carl McIntyre.  Notables:  Bill Smith aka Bill Mack (II) (1963-1966,) Hugh Lampman, Ben Toney, Duane Ramsey, Dan Allison, Reb Foster aka Dennis Bruton, Willie Nelson (yes, the country singer!), Joe Fuchs aka Jay Weaver (began 1/1966,) Brett Allison, Vincent Pulido, Jack Britton, "Dandy" Don Logan (1958-59,) Dick Wheeler (jock and co-host of "Ladies...Pat Patterson,") Glenn "Uncle Hank" Craig, Ron McCoy, Gary Smith (worked briefly at KCUL before the call letter change,) Bo Powell, Ron Rice (II), Gene Kelly aka "Jelly Belly Kelly" and "Chuck Roast," Virgil Dowell aka Mike Bradley (PD,) Bob White (PD,) Bob Allen (PD and host of "Open Line,") Bill Hightower, Bud Faulder, Eddie Stewart, Ray Robbins, Morgan Choat, Bob Peacock ("The Bird With the Word,") Terry Jones, Bob McCord, Pat Patterson (host of "Ladies...Pat Patterson,") Jerry Condra aka Jerry Parks (not the WFAA-TV personality,) Bruce Chambers (president and GM,) Roy Lemons (GM, 1966-1969,) Don Sitton aka Don Miller, John Fox, Angie Meer, Jim Tucker, Nestor Cuestra, Dick McLendon (host of "The Lunch Munchers Show,") Carl Logan, Bill Woods (host of "Teen Club," which featured the 'Great 38' songs,) Anne Cross, Johnnie Lemons, "Wild" Bill Reynolds, A. B. Culbertson, M. Ward Bailey, T. S. Christopher, John Griffith, Maydell Wallace, Joe McKinney, Max "Pretty Boy" Floyd, Horace Logan, James MacKrell, Sr aka "Uncle Mac" (jock and hosted "Guiding Lines;" father of local jock and later game show host Jim MacKrell,) Rita Reynolds (host of "Women's Wisdom,") Jose Guerrero (host of "Mexico Lindo" show,) "Easy" Ed Hamilton, Larry Glenn, Tony Berta, Darrell Monroe, Andres Mantecon, Lawton Williams (PD and GM.)  Broadcasted with 50Kw (day) and 1,000 watts (night.)  Station located at 3607 Camp Bowie, Fort Worth.

1570
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KPYK, Terrell.  Call letters established 4/1/1992.  Format:  Big Bands and Great Singers (primarily adult standards and big band from the 1930s-1950s.)  Owner:  Mohnkern Electronics, Inc.  Nickname:  "The Pick of the Dial."  Chuck Mohnkern and his father Len have also owned the Radio Shack dealer store in Terrell since 1980.  KPYK has petitioned the FCC for a position on the expanded AM band.  Programs:  "The Joe Mazza Show," Karaoke Night," "The Old Ship of Zion," "Journey into Song," "Imagination Theater," "Mick Williams Cyber-Line" (2001-present; syndicated from USA Radio Network,) "Good Day USA," "Oasis," "Musical Milestones," "Second Thoughts," "Guidelines," "Keys for Kids," "Earth and Sky," When Radio Was," "Down Gilead Lane," "Unshackled," "Radio Super Heroes," "The Bob Snyder Show," "Saturday Date."  Also broadcasts Terrell city council and school board meetings and high school sports.  Notables:  Len Mohnkern, Warren Brooks, Chris Babler, Liz Mohnkern, Marvin Malone, Chuck Mohnkern, Eric Bradley, Reginald Daniels, Dave Washburn, Bill Rand, Warren Daniels, John McCarty (voicetracked.)
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KTER, Terrell.  Station established 11/6/1949.  Format unknown.  Owner: Terrell Tribune (1947-1950s,) Wnorowski (1950s-early 1960s,) Billy D. Pirtle (early 1960s-late 1970s; the station changed hands twice before Pirtle had to repossess it!,)  Billy D. Pirtle (early 1980s-1986,) Bill Collins (1986-1992.)  Daytime-only station, as the Terrell Tribune originally chose a frequency that was designated as a Mexican clear channel, and had power limits imposed after sunset (it was also less expensive to operate for 12 hours instead of 24!)  Also used occasionally as a broadcasting lab for Elkins Institute students in the 1970s.  Notables:  Ben Smith, Mike Terry, Bob Wilson, Derek Frerichs, Bill Boyd (country singer,) Jim Boyd (brother of Bill,) , Rev. Warren Daniels (cleaned station in exchange for getting a Sunday radio program,) Jim Rose (PD/MD,) Jack Darden (1966,) Joe Goodwin, Gus Jones, Bill Hughes, Dale Berry.  Located at the American National Bank building on Moore St.

1580

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KGAF, Gainesville.  Station established 10/1/1947.   Format:  Classic Country.  Nicknames:  "Hometown Radio," "The Voice and Choice of North Texas and Southern Oklahoma."  Owner:  Eberhart Broadcasting (2/2008-present; headed by longtime DFW radio personality and consultant Steve Eberhart, who jocked at KGAF in the 1970s,) First IV Media (11/15/1974-2/2008,) White Fuel Corporation, Bud and Joe Leonard Jr. dba Gainesville Broadcasting (1947-1967; Joe Leonard also owned Lin Records.)  Programs: "Dee's Breakfast Club," "Swap it to Me."  Notables:  Steve Eberhart (disc jockey, 12/3/1973-5/1976; owner, 2/2008-present,) Dee Blanton (host of "Dee's Breakfast Club,") Curt Spain, Stephen Monahan, Chad Henderson, Clay Corbett, Ray Whitworth aka Ray Kennedy (to fall, 1977,) Randy Williams, Mike Stoddard, Mike Parenti aka Mike Monday, Ross Whitmire, David Klement, Mike Smith, Pat Bolin, Steve Simmons, Bob Couch.  Studios located at Radio Hill in Gainesville.  Formerly sister to KGAF-94.5 FM.  Owner Steve Eberhart explains the station layout:  "At the time in the late 1940s, it was well built with acoustic soundproof walls and windows.  It included a master control room (later the transmitter room, which was (later) enlarged to facilitate the FM transmitter, a horseshow Gates console setup for disc jockey duty, a small production studio, and a large, live performance studio where live bands performed in the early days!  The performance studio for (many) years later was used as an office, but is still equipped with soundproofing, and the old mic jacks that were used (then.)  It is actually one of the few 'retro studios' still in use that essentially hasn't changed since the 1940s."  Eberhart also mentioned that Elvis Presley visited the KGAF studios in the 1950s, prior to a concert in Gainesville!  The Leonard brothers made more money off selling FM sideband broadcasts (ala Muzak) to local businesses.  Daytime only station (1947-1980s,) 24 hours a day (1980s-present.)

And, separately, serving Dallas-Love Field Airport:

WPQE577, Dallas.  Low-power station broadcasting parking information for Love Field airport.


1600
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KRVA, Cockrell Hill.  Call letters established 1/1/1993.  Format:  Adult Contemporary (via Jones Radio Network; 11/1/2006 to present,) Asian/Indian (2005-10/31/2006,) Spanish.  Owner:  Z-Spanish Media, Entravision, Mortenson (11/1/2006-present.)  Nickname:  "Radio Variedades."  Was simulcast of sister station KRVA-FM 106.9 until the FM was sold to First Broadcasting (the stations still share the same calls, but are no longer related.)
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KSSA, Cockrell Hill.  Call letters re-established 8/5/1987.  Format:  Spanish.  Call letters stood for "casa."  Owner:  Marcos Rodriguez  dba Radio Plano Inc.  Call letters resurrected from 1270 AM.  Sister station to KSSA-FM.  Program:  "A Su Salad."  Notable:  Felice Doyle (host of "A Su Salad.")  Frequency was dark between 1/7/1987 and 8/5/87.  Moved license to Cockrell Hill in 1987.
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KTNS, Plano.  Call letters established 7/1/1985.  Format:  News/Talk.  ABC Talk Radio affiliate.  Owner:  John T. Pickens dba NMR, Inc.  Programs:  "The Evening News Hour" (local,) "Owen Spann Show," "Michael Jackson Show" (not the singer,) "Ira Fistell Show," "Ray Briem Show" (ABC syndicated shows.)  Notables:  Andy McCollum, Harold Baker, Randy Wiles, Pat Foss, Ed Busch, Andy Connell aka Adam Kelly, Art Riley, Bob Miller.  Dark after 1/7/1987.  Located at 1310 Avenue K, Plano.
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KXVI, Plano.  Call letters established c. 1976.  Format:  Middle-of-the-Road (c. 1976-77,) Contemporary Christian, Christian Rock (1985,) Country Gospel (late 1970s.)  Call letters stood for "16" in roman numerals.  Nickname:  "K-16," "First in Gospel Country," "Top Rated Metro-Plex Suburban Radio."  Owner:  John T. Pickens dba NMR, Inc.  Programs:  "This Week in McKinney," "Gospel Show."  Notables:  Dave Mitchell, Mark Bacall, Phil Dickerson, Chris Goodwin, Wyatt Cox (ND, 1982-84,) Andy Connell aka Crash Kelly, Ike Blevins, Jennifer Ellis, Bob Wilson, Tim Easley, Rhonda Miller, Bob Brown, Bruce S. Ford, Josh Fuller, Larry Collins (as host of "This Week in McKinney,") Bob Wilson (GM,) Bruce Sifford (as host of "Gospel Show.")  Located first in McKinney, then to 1310 Avenue K, Plano.  Recently, the KXVI calls were re-used at 100.5-Pittsburg for "The Bridge Network," a DFW-based religious broadcaster serving East Texas.
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KYAL, McKinney.  Call letters established 9/1965.  Format:  Country (late 1960s.)  Call letters stood for "y'all."  Nickname:  "Your North Texas Neighbor," "Top of the Dial at 1600," "The People Pleasers," "Top-Rated Suburban Radio Station."  Owner:  AHB Broadcasting (3/1969-1971,) John T. Pickens dba NMR, Inc. (1971-1987.)  Notables: Larry Shannon, Stan Wilson (II), Brad Wilson (who started at the station at age 14; Stan Wilson was Brad's father,) Bob Wilson, Bill Bragg, Larry Collins, Arnold Poovey aka "Texas Joe" Poovey aka "Groovey Joe Poovey" aka Johnny Dallas, Mike Terry, Thomas Shelby Brown aka Randy Ryder (late of KPCN; concurrently owned a Baskin-Robbins franchise in Duncanville, TX,) Wayne Farrar, Troy G. Young, James L. Shell (GM,) James Thomason.  Daytime only station.  Located in Frisco (1968-69,) at 1312 Central Expressway, Plano (1969-1972;) 701 15th Street, Plano (1971-74,) and 1310 Avenue K, Plano (1974-on.)
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KMAE, McKinney.  Station established 9/29/1947.  Format:  Variety.  Owner: George W. Smith Jr dba McKinney Air Enterprises (Smith was mayor of McKinney, 1957-59.)  Network affiliation:  Liberty Broadcasting Service.  Station band:  "The Bennie Dugger Quartet."  Notables:  Wayne Farrar, C. W. Rampy, H. D. Mouzon (sales and later news director; sold cars in the 1970s and 1980s, eventually opening Mouzon Jeep in Richardson, TX in the late-1980s,) Arnold Poovey aka "Texas Joe" Poovey aka "Groovey Joe Poovey" aka Johnny Dallas, Roger Dimick (1964-65.)  Located at 218 E. Virginia, McKinney.  Daytime only station.
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1620

WPMV714, Lewisville.  Low-power station broadcasting city of Lewisville information.


1630
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KKGM, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 4/1/2004.  Format:  Southern Gospel.  Owner:  Mortenson.  Successor to KSKY-660, longtime Religious station that switched to Conservative Talk on 4/5/2004.  The format and most of the employees defected to KKGM.  Carries all Oklahoma University (OU) sporting events.  Notables:  Lon Sosh (GM,) Ray Whitworth, Jack Davis (PD; with KAAM-770 concurrently until 2007,) Paul Hughes, Nancy "Nan" Burns, Bob Hood, "Paladin," Craig Whitehurst, Jason Fields, Beverly Black, Mike Price, John Holcomb, Miguel Corona.  Station located at Executive Airport (the former Red Bird Airport.)

KNAX, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 3/20/2001.  Format:  Spanish Religious ("Radio Christiana," began 7/2002,) Spanish (simulcast of KTNO-1440,  3/20/2001-7/2002.)  Owner:  Mortenson (bought 5/31/2002.)  Station had applied for license city move to Euless and for call letters "KHEV," but went with "KKGM" instead in 2004.

KBCM, Fort Worth.  Call letters established 3/6/1998.  Format:  Spanish.

KOME, Fort Worth.  Station established 1994.  Format:  Gospel (simulcast of KHVN.)  Owner:  Infinity.  Intended to be the dial expansion position for KHVN-970 kHz, to become the new permanent home for KHVN in 2004, but Infinity sold the frequency in 1998.  Since Mortenson now owns both 970 and 1630, divesting of KHVN was scheduled for 12/31/2007.
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1640

WPYR912, Dallas.  Low-power station broadcasting event and parking information for downtown Dallas.


1640/1680

WCO767, Dallas-Fort Worth Airport.  Low-power stations broadcasting American Airlines departures (1640) and arrivals (1680) from Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.  One source says that only 1680 is currently in use.  Formerly known as WPLR660.


1670

WPIW244, Farmers Branch.  Low-power station broadcasting city of Farmers Branch information.  Moved from 690 kc.

WPMG537, Midlothian.  Low-power station broadcasting city of Midlothian information.  Moved from 800 kc.

WPPG486, Watauga.  Low-power station broadcasting city of Watauga information.


1700
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KKLF, Richardson.  Call letters established 3/21/2005 (calls moved from 950 AM; 950 was dissolved in 2005 as part of FCC dial expansion program of 1989.)  Format:  Sports Talk (simulcast of KTCK-1310,) Comedy.  Owner:  Susquehanna.  City of license changed to Richardson in 2005.

KTBK, Sherman.  Station established 3/31/1999, although licensed on 6/22/1998.  Format:  Sports Talk (simulcast of KTCK-1310.)  Broadcasts in stereo.  Owner:  Susquehanna (bought 3/13/1998,) Sock Hop Radio.


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Thanks to Safford Black for use of several of the logos on this page, and to Bill Fairlie and Richard Schroeder for their early radio research.  And special thanks to Alan Barnes, Chris Huff, Dave Tucker, Randy Brown, Jay Weaver, Michael James (Lucas), the late Larry Shannon, Gary McBrayer, the late Steve Farrington, Rusty Reynolds, Steve Eberhart, Robert Bass, the late Lan Roberts, Bob Bruton, Jim Cumbie, Chip Kelley, the late Don Keyes, Jim Edwards (Bruce Buchanan,) Dan Halyburton, Dave Mitchell, David Stewart, Mike Ehrle, Ralph Gould, Mickey Grant, Jay Philpott, Ray (Kennedy) Whitworth, Chuck Mohnkern, Bob Fox, Dee Blanton, David Hultsman, Frank Benton, the late Art Riley, Jack Darden, Laurel Ornish, John Dew, Jim Belcher, Mick Williams, Paul Gleiser, Mike Robinson, Bud Turner, Alisa (Robinson) Simmons, Michael Parmes, Ray Weathers, Stuart McRae, Michael Shawn, Ed Padget, Stu Hepburn, Mark Shepard, Melissa Rasmussen, Sam Goforth, Russ Bloxom, Lee Brumm, Verne Horsley, John Lewis Puff, Doug Helton, Tom Roman, Jim Goodman, Jim Ewing, Rob Milford, Robert Snyder, Kevin Tekel, Jim Thomas, Rick Boisvert, Mike Shaw, Alan Balthrop, David Crosthwait, Gary West, Greg Sells, Mike Vasquez, Brett X, Bruce Carter, Arnold L. Davis Jr., Jeffery Folse and the many others who have corresponded with names, airdates, reflections, encouragement and other useful information!
Backronym:  A reversed acronym—the words of the expanded term were chosen to fit the letters of the acronym, instead of the other way around.  For example, the call letters "KFJZ" were not originally chosen to stand for "Fort Worth Jazz;" this was a phrase designed way after the fact to fit the old call letters.


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